Daily Women's Health Policy Report

  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
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Daily Women's Health Policy Report by the National Partnership for Women & Families
Updated: 1 hour 18 min ago

Maine Senate Defeats Bill Requiring State HHS Licensing for Abortion Clinics

Wed, 06/17/2015 - 12:45

The Maine Senate on Friday voted 21-14 against a bill (LD 1312) that would have imposed new restrictions on abortion clinics in the state, AP/Washington Times reports.

Maine Senate Defeats Bill Requiring State HHS Licensing for Abortion Clinics

June 16, 2015 — The Maine Senate on Friday voted 21-14 against a bill (LD 1312) that would have imposed new restrictions on abortion clinics in the state, AP/Washington Times reports.

Specifically, the measure would have required the three abortion clinics in the state to obtain licenses from the Maine Department of Health and Human Services. It also would have required the state HHS to establish safety and operational standards for the clinics. Opponents of the measure noted that clinic physicians are already subject to licensing requirements and that clinics already might be regulated by federal standards (AP/Washington Times, 6/12).

The state House rejected the measure last month (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/1).


NY Times Op-Ed: N.C. Ultrasound Law Has 'Finally Died,' But Other States 'Aren't So Lucky'

Wed, 06/17/2015 - 12:45

A North Carolina law (SL 2011-405) that required physicians to perform an ultrasound on a woman before an abortion and show and describe the image to her, even against her wishes, "finally died Monday morning when the Supreme Court declined to consider the federal appeals court ruling that struck it down," columnist Jesse Wegman writes in an opinion piece in the New York Times' "Taking Note."

NY Times Op-Ed: N.C. Ultrasound Law Has 'Finally Died,' But Other States 'Aren't So Lucky'

June 16, 2015 — A North Carolina law (SL 2011-405) that required physicians to perform an ultrasound on a woman before an abortion and show and describe the image to her, even against her wishes, "finally died Monday morning when the Supreme Court declined to consider the federal appeals court ruling that struck it down," columnist Jesse Wegman writes in an opinion piece in the New York Times' "Taking Note."

Wegman explains that "[d]epending on where they live, those seeking to exercise their constitutional right to an abortion must endure, among other things, waiting periods of up to 3 days, medically inaccurate lectures, or trips of hundreds of miles to reach the closest operating clinic that hasn't been shut down on false pretenses." However, he notes that "for the purest expression of paternalistic condescension, wrapped in a bow of bodily invasion and delivered via an unequivocal violation of the First Amendment, it is hard to match the ... ultrasound laws" in North Carolina and other states.

"The idea behind such laws, of course, is that pregnant women ... have not truly contemplated the gravity of the procedure they have chosen to undergo" and that, if they viewed an ultrasound, they would "happily carry their fetus to term," Wegman writes.

Wegman praises 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Harvie Wilkinson, who in a decision last December "saw North Carolina's law for the repugnant farce that it is." According to Wegman, Wilkinson ruled that the "law had nothing to do with informed consent" and was "'quintessential compelled speech' ... intended only to convey 'the full weight of the state's moral condemnation' of a woman exercising her constitutional rights." He adds, "Wilkinson had it precisely right -- and for now, at least, the Supreme Court does not disagree."

However, Wegman notes that "while North Carolina women may be able to rest a little easier in the knowledge that they will not have to endure medical procedures against their will, women in Texas, Louisiana and Wisconsin aren't so lucky." He writes, "All of these laws don't change the fundamental fact that abortion is and has always been an intensely personal decision" that "[w]omen are no less capable today of making ... than they were in 1973, when the Supreme Court recognized their constitutional right to do so" (Wegman, "Taking Note," New York Times, 6/15).


Blogs Voice Support for All Pregnant Women's Repro Health Choices, Detail Benefits of Insured OTC Contraception, More

Tue, 06/16/2015 - 16:27

Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress," Salon and more.

Blogs Voice Support for All Pregnant Women's Repro Health Choices, Detail Benefits of Insured OTC Contraception, More

June 16, 2015 — Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress," Salon and more.

ABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "Why Are Abortion Foes Still Surprised When Pro-Choice Women Have Babies?" Tara Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": "Pro-choice women are taking to the internet to make the point that it's very possible to both support legal abortion rights and choose to become a parent," Culp-Ressler writes. She explains that abortion-rights opponents "are sometimes under the impression that being pregnant is incompatible with being pro-choice," particularly "when prominent reproductive rights supporters decide to start families." Culp-Ressler cites a project that aims to dispel this notion, the "Pregnant, Parenting, and Pro-Choice" blog, which "provides a platform for reproductive rights supporters to submit photos of themselves during their pregnancies -- and explain why making the decision to become a mother actually fits into their larger worldview about giving every individual the tools they need to plan their own family." She concludes by quoting project participant Farah Diaz Tello, who explains that she is '"pro-choice because [she affirms] the humanity and dignity of all pregnant people in deciding whether they carry a pregnancy to term, how they give birth, and whether they parent the child they give birth to'" (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 6/12).

CONTRACEPTION: "OB-GYN Kathleen Morrell Explains the Benefits of Laws Allowing Women To Get Birth Control Over-the-Counter," Jenny Kutner, Salon: Kutner interviews New York-based ob-gyn Kathleen Morrell about the pros and cons of over-the-counter birth control in California -- "which will begin allowing pharmacists to prescribe" birth control in a few months -- and in general. According to Morrell, "the major pro" regarding California's law (SB 493) "is that ([OTC] birth control) just increases access, specifically when it comes to the pill" and "would potentially have a positive effect on the never-changing unintended pregnancy rate in this country." Further, she said "involving the pharmacist" in prescribing contraception "could ... potentially allow for a woman's health insurance to cover it" rather than making "birth control ... just be [OTC], period," which could require women to pay out of pocket for their contraception. Noting the importance of "protections for cost," Morrell said, "We don't just want stuff over-the-counter ... we want people to have insurance coverage for it." Making birth control available over the counter without insurance coverage "doesn’t mean it's accessible." Morrell acknowledged that physicians might be "concerned" about women using such access "to replace preventative care," but she said "[w]omen are smart, and [physicians] should trust them to know what's right for them, and ... being a barrier to their contraceptive needs is [not] the right way to go as providers" (Kutner, Salon, 6/13).

What others are saying about contraception:

~ "How Contraception Transformed the American Family," Martha Bailey, The Atlantic.

ABORTION RESTRICTIONS: "Roberts Court Refuses To Hear North Carolina Forced Ultrasound Case," Jessica Mason Pieklo, RH Reality Check: "Reproductive rights advocates scored a major victory Monday" after the Supreme Court rejected an appeal from North Carolina over a blocked state law that would require physicians to perform an ultrasound and "display and describe the ... image" to a woman, even if "the patient objects," Mason Pieklo writes. According to Mason Pieklo, a federal court "preliminarily blocked the law" in 2011, and it was later permanently blocked by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 2014, when the three-judge panel ruled the "law violates the First Amendment rights of physicians by forcing them to deliver politically motivated communications." North Carolina lawyers appealed the decision to the Supreme Court, which denied the review, "mark[ing] the second time the [high court under Chief Justice John Roberts] has refused to step into the fight over mandatory ultrasound laws" (Mason Pieklo, RH Reality Check, 6/15).

What others are saying about abortion restrictions:

~ "Repro Wrap: The End of Abortion Access in Texas and Other News," Robin Marty, Care2.

CPCs: "The Constitutionality of Anti-Abortion License Plates is up for Debate," Emma Niles, Ms. Magazine blog: Across the country, states sell license plates with the words "Choose Life," and "most of them raise money for anti-abortion organizations" Niles writes. Citing a Guttmacher Institute report, Niles explains that "currently 28 states ... allow these types of plates, and out of those states 15 allow the money raised to go directly to anti-abortion organizations." However, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in May "ruled that 'Choose Life' license plates are unconstitutional because they are 'patently offensive' speech" and the DMV acted within its discretion when it refused to issue them. Similarly, "an appellate court in North Carolina upheld a judge's ruling that the 'Choose Life' license plate was unconstitutional because although the DMV allowed the plate, it had rejected designs with messages like 'Trust Women' and 'Respect Choice,'" Niles writes. According to Niles, "[t]he number of states with 'Choose Life' programs has risen over the years, so these types of cases may soon become more common" (Niles, Ms. Magazine blog, 6/15).

SEXUALITY EDUCATION: "LGBTQ Youth Deserve 'Real Education' About Sexuality," Gloria Malone, RH Reality Check: Data on pregnancy rates for lesbian, gay and bisexual youth, as well as recent outbreaks of sexually transmitted infections, "show widespread need not only for comprehensive sexual health education, but LGBTQ-inclusive sex ed in particular," Malone writes. She points to a study in the American Journal of Public Health that "found that New York City youth who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual were more likely than heterosexual-identifying youth to experience a pregnancy." Further, "curricula in half the states in this country stress abstinence," she writes, noting that "since these students are not prepared for sexual encounters, there have been a number of outbreaks of various STIs nationwide." According to Malone, "Because sexual health education is geared toward a hetero- and cis-normative audience, LGBTQ youth are not receiving the information they need to protect themselves from all sexual activities and to enjoy the wanted experiences they do encounter." Urging a "complete overhaul of the sexual health education in the United States," Malone voices support for the Real Education for Healthy Youth Act (HR 1706), which "calls for sexual health education to discuss healthy relationships, reproduction, sexuality, and consent in addition to safer sex information with LGBTQ-inclusive language" (Malone, RH Reality Check, 6/12).


NY Times Op-Ed: N.C. Ultrasound Law Has 'Finally Died,' But Other States 'Aren't So Lucky'

Tue, 06/16/2015 - 15:38

A North Carolina law (SL 2011-405) that required physicians to perform an ultrasound on a woman before an abortion and show and describe the image to her, even against her wishes, "finally died Monday morning when the Supreme Court declined to consider the federal appeals court ruling that struck it down," columnist Jesse Wegman writes in an opinion piece in the New York Times' "Taking Note."

NY Times Op-Ed: N.C. Ultrasound Law Has 'Finally Died,' But Other States 'Aren't So Lucky'

June 16, 2015 — A North Carolina law (SL 2011-405) that required physicians to perform an ultrasound on a woman before an abortion and show and describe the image to her, even against her wishes, "finally died Monday morning when the Supreme Court declined to consider the federal appeals court ruling that struck it down," columnist Jesse Wegman writes in an opinion piece in the New York Times' "Taking Note."

Wegman explains that "[d]epending on where they live, those seeking to exercise their constitutional right to an abortion must endure, among other things, waiting periods of up to 3 days, medically inaccurate lectures, or trips of hundreds of miles to reach the closest operating clinic that hasn't been shut down on false pretenses." However, he notes that "for the purest expression of paternalistic condescension, wrapped in a bow of bodily invasion and delivered via an unequivocal violation of the First Amendment, it is hard to match the ... ultrasound laws" in North Carolina and other states.

"The idea behind such laws, of course, is that pregnant women ... have not truly contemplated the gravity of the procedure they have chosen to undergo" and that, if they viewed an ultrasound, they would "happily carry their fetus to term," Wegman writes.

Wegman praises 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Harvie Wilkinson, who in a decision last December "saw North Carolina's law for the repugnant farce that it is." According to Wegman, Wilkinson ruled that the "law had nothing to do with informed consent" and was "'quintessential compelled speech' ... intended only to convey 'the full weight of the state's moral condemnation' of a woman exercising her constitutional rights." He adds, "Wilkinson had it precisely right -- and for now, at least, the Supreme Court does not disagree."

However, Wegman notes that "while North Carolina women may be able to rest a little easier in the knowledge that they will not have to endure medical procedures against their will, women in Texas, Louisiana and Wisconsin aren't so lucky." He writes, "All of these laws don't change the fundamental fact that abortion is and has always been an intensely personal decision" that "[w]omen are no less capable today of making ... than they were in 1973, when the Supreme Court recognized their constitutional right to do so" (Wegman, "Taking Note," New York Times, 6/15).


Maine Senate Defeats Bill Requiring State HHS Licensing for Abortion Clinics

Tue, 06/16/2015 - 15:04

The Maine Senate on Friday voted 21-14 against a bill (LD 1312) that would have imposed new restrictions on abortion clinics in the state, AP/Washington Times reports.

Maine Senate Defeats Bill Requiring State HHS Licensing for Abortion Clinics

June 16, 2015 — The Maine Senate on Friday voted 21-14 against a bill (LD 1312) that would have imposed new restrictions on abortion clinics in the state, AP/Washington Times reports.

Specifically, the measure would have required the three abortion clinics in the state to obtain licenses from the Maine Department of Health and Human Services. It also would have required the state HHS to establish safety and operational standards for the clinics. Opponents of the measure noted that clinic physicians are already subject to licensing requirements and that clinics already might be regulated by federal standards (AP/Washington Times, 6/12).

The state House rejected the measure last month (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/1).


Competing Mass. Bills Would Affect Access to Abortion Care

Tue, 06/16/2015 - 15:01

Massachusetts lawmakers have introduced several measures that would affect access to reproductive health care in the state, the CNHI/Gloucester Times reports.

Competing Mass. Bills Would Affect Access to Abortion Care

June 16, 2015 — Massachusetts lawmakers have introduced several measures that would affect access to reproductive health care in the state, the CNHI/Gloucester Times reports.

According to the CHNI/Times, Gov. Charlie Baker (R) has not indicated whether he will sign any of the three proposed bills should they pass the state Legislature.

Abortion-Rights Advocates Back Measures To Protect Women, Expand Abortion Access

NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts and abortion-rights groups are supporting legislation that would help to improve access to reproductive health services.

For example, one measure (S 1232) would prohibit state agencies from allocating funding or referring patients to crisis pregnancy centers. The bill is supported by more than a dozen state legislators.

Another measure (H 2070) would require women under age 16 to receive permission from a judge to have an abortion if their parents or legal guardians are unable or unwilling to provide consent for the procedure (Wade, CHNI/Gloucester Times, 6/11). Current state law imposes such requirements for all minors under age 18 (GL 1.XVI.112.12S). The measure is supported by more than 50 state lawmakers.

Megan Amundson, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts, said in support of the judicial bypass measure, "We know that requiring young women to consult with their parents does not compel them to do so. It results in them taking desperate measures, such as seeking care out of state or in other ways that might be unsafe."

TRAP Measure

Meanwhile, state Reps. Betty Poirier (R) and John Rogers (D) have introduced a measure (H 2039) that would require clinics that perform at least 10 abortions annually to meet certain licensing criteria. The bill also would subject abortion clinics to inspections.

Poirer said the measure is intended to protect women's health.

However, abortion-rights supporters say clinics in the state do not need additional inspections since they already are safe. They said the "deceptive" bill was designed to restrict access to reproductive health services and could force some physicians and clinics to stop providing abortion care.

Amundson said, "There's no place in our state for policies or facilities that seek to limit access to abortion under the guise of protecting women." She added, "We cannot allow scare tactics and shame to replace medical science and the basic right to health care."

Similarly, Tricia Wajda, spokesperson for the Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts, said the measure "is an attempt to restrict access to safe, legal abortion" (CHNI/Gloucester Times, 6/11).


Los Angeles Times: Measures Calling for OTC Birth Control Must Ensure Affordability

Tue, 06/16/2015 - 14:57

Efforts that aim to "make it easier for some oral contraceptives ... to be sold over the counter" might "[t]heoretically ... guarantee the most accessibility" to contraception, "but not if women are stuck buying it without [the] benefit of insurance," a Los Angeles Times editorial states.

Los Angeles Times: Measures Calling for OTC Birth Control Must Ensure Affordability

June 16, 2015 — Efforts that aim to "make it easier for some oral contraceptives ... to be sold over the counter" might "[t]heoretically ... guarantee the most accessibility" to contraception, "but not if women are stuck buying it without [the] benefit of insurance," a Los Angeles Times editorial states.

The editorial describes a measure (S 1438) that "would incentivize drug companies to apply to [FDA] for permission to make their prescription contraceptives available over the counter" and repeal the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) ban on the use of flexible spending accounts for non-prescription drugs.

"All that sounds great," but "[t]here's just one big problem," the editorial states. It explains that while the ACA requires insurers to cover FDA-approved prescription contraceptives, "[t]here is no such requirement for over-the-counter medications." As a result, "[m]any women -- if not all -- would find themselves paying out of pocket for contraception" that had been available at no cost under the ACA, the editorial states.

The editorial notes that groups such as the Planned Parenthood Action Fund and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists -- both of whom oppose the bill "have pointed out that birth control isn't really accessible unless it's affordable." According to the editorial, oral contraceptives can cost up to $600 annually for someone who is uninsured. Further, the measure "would bar anyone younger than 18 from purchasing the pills over the counter," the editorial adds.

According to the editorial, "[t]he better alternative is [S 1532]," which "calls for the continuation of complete insurance coverage of any oral contraceptive after it goes from prescription to over the counter." Moreover, the editorial notes that the bill "would not set an age requirement for purchase."

The editorial states, "If the FDA approves making oral contraceptives available over the counter, Congress should continue to require insurers to cover its cost" (Los Angeles Times, 6/14).


Washington Post Op-Ed: 'Coded Language' of The Past 'Giving Way to Frank Talk' About Abortion

Tue, 06/16/2015 - 14:53

When it comes to discussing abortion, "coded language of the older guard is giving way to frank talk from a younger generation of activists," columnist Jill Filipovic writes in a Washington Post opinion piece. She writes, "Today, activists are realizing that the only way to erase the stigma is to talk about it."

Washington Post Op-Ed: 'Coded Language' of The Past 'Giving Way to Frank Talk' About Abortion

June 16, 2015 — When it comes to discussing abortion, "coded language of the older guard is giving way to frank talk from a younger generation of activists," columnist Jill Filipovic writes in a Washington Post opinion piece. She writes, "Today, activists are realizing that the only way to erase the stigma is to talk about it."

Filipovic notes that in the three years after the 2010 midterm elections "more abortion restrictions were passed ... than in the previous decade." NARAL Pro-Choice America President Ilyse Hogue has called the phenomenon "the peak of a 40-year plan on the part of the anti-choice movement to get what they want," adding, "I think that has caused a reckoning within organizations and the movement to say, we can suffer death by a thousand cuts, or we can actually create our own long-term plan."

Changing the Dialogue

"Younger activists are shaping the dialogue, taking cues from the Internet, where conversational norms reward unabashed honesty about the female experience," Filipovic explains. She notes that, to these activists, it "makes little sense" to "excis[e] the word 'abortion' from abortion rights."

Further, Filipovic notes that some politicians have shifted from avoiding the topic to discussing it directly. For example, President Obama "evaded the issue in [his] 2008 presidential [campaign]," but in January he "used the word 'abortion' in one of his State of the Union addresses for the first time," she writes.

According to Filipovic, abortion-rights supporters "are also putting a human face on the procedure." She writes about how former Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis (D) and Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards have shared their abortion stories, while several "[o]rganizations that encourage abortion story-sharing, including Exhale, Advocates for Youth and the Sea Change Program, have created platforms and guides for women who want to speak out."

"The shift is not just political; it's cultural," Filipovic writes, pointing to recent depictions of abortion experiences in the media, such as the 2014 romantic comedy "Obvious Child," a new TV show called "Jane the Virgin," and features in Elle and New York magazine. "Today, the percentage of Americans who say they're pro-choice is at a seven-year high," she writes.

Shift From "'The Good Abortion,'" Contextualizing Abortion in Reproductive Justice

In addition, Filipovic notes that younger abortion-rights advocates are "pushing back on what they call the narrative of 'the good abortion'" and are "talking about the whole range of their experiences." She writes, "Most women who terminate pregnancies aren't facing life-threatening tragedies but rather more mundane ones: The most common reasons women give include not being financially ready, poor timing for a baby, issues with a partner and the need to care for the children they already have." Today's activists note that "playing down that reality -- and the importance of abortion services for all women -- contributes to the stigma that keeps abortion shameful and politically contentious," Filipovic writes.

Filipovic also discusses abortion in the context of reproductive justice and intersectionality. She notes that Monica Simpson, executive director of SisterSong: Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, defines the term "reproductive justice" as "'the human right of every individual to have a child, to not have a child, to parent the children they have in healthy and sustainable environments, and the human right to bodily autonomy.'"

According to Fillipovic, "With America becoming more racially diverse, Simpson says more traditional pro-choice organizations are realizing that they need to appeal to a wider demographic in order to survive." She writes that "mainstream reproductive rights and health groups increasingly seem to employ" a "model pioneered by reproductive-justice groups -- talk about abortion honestly, contextualize it as one piece of women's lives, focus on the most vulnerable" (Filipovic, Washington Post, 6/12).


Antiabortion-Rights Measures Add Up To Limit Access

Mon, 06/15/2015 - 16:17

State laws that have incrementally restricted access to abortion are accumulating, making the procedure nearly inaccessible in some states, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Antiabortion-Rights Measures Add Up To Limit Access

June 15, 2015 — State laws that have incrementally restricted access to abortion are accumulating, making the procedure nearly inaccessible in some states, the Los Angeles Times reports.

States Imposing More Abortion Restrictions

For example, according to the Guttmacher Institute, 26 states have implemented mandatory delays that require women to wait a specific amount of time between an initial consultation and an abortion. At least five states have implemented or lengthened such delays since April, including Arkansas (Act 1086), Florida (HB 633), North Carolina (HB 465), Oklahoma (HB 1409) and Tennessee (SB 1222).

Meanwhile, several states have also passed procedural restrictions. For example, Kansas (SB 95) and Oklahoma (HB 1721) have both prohibited a common surgical method for second-trimester abortions. Separately, Arkansas has passed about six new abortion restrictions, including a law lengthening its mandatory delay, a parental involvement measure (HB 1424) and a law (Act 1086) that requires physicians to tell patients medically inaccurate information about medication abortion, among others.

Supreme Court Could Weigh In

According to the Times, the Supreme Court is the "backdrop" for the growing number of restrictions, as the high court will soon decide whether to weigh in significantly on abortion access for the first time since 1992 (La Ganga, Los Angeles Times, 6/13).

The high court today announced that it would not review a case that blocked parts of a North Carolina ultrasound law (SL 2011-405). However, it has not yet stated whether it will consider another case involving an admitting privileges requirement (HB 1390) in Mississippi that, if allowed to take effect, would shut down the state's sole abortion clinic (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/15).

Comments

Nancy Northup, president and CEO of the Center for Reproductive Rights, said, "It is a culmination of the wave of restrictions of the past three years." She added, "You see one type of restriction following another, following another. When you put them all together, the result is a closing-off of access."

Similarly, Jennifer Dalven, director of the American Civil Liberties Union's Reproductive Freedom Project, said the strategy of such restrictions is similar to "putting up a wall brick by brick by brick, slowly, so no one notices." For example, she cited Arkansas' new laws and noted that while each individual abortion restriction might not spark concern, when considered all together, "it becomes very clear what the state is trying to do -- prevent a woman who's decided to have an abortion from actually getting one."

Meanwhile, Elizabeth Nash, a policy analyst at the Guttmacher Institute, said Arkansas "is an example of a state that has changed access" to abortion. She noted that "similar dramatic changes" have occurred "in places like Kansas, Texas, Arizona, Oklahoma and North Carolina."

Overall, Nash said abortion access "in some ways it looks like what we saw before" Roe vs. Wade. "What you're seeing is access maintained for the most part along the West Coast and in the Northeast, but real incursions in access in the South and middle of the country," she said (Los Angeles Times, 6/13).


SCOTUS Rejects Appeal for Blocked N.C. Ultrasound Law

Mon, 06/15/2015 - 15:40

The Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear an appeal from North Carolina over a partly blocked state law (SL 2011-45) that would require physicians to perform ultrasounds and describe the images to a woman before an abortion, AP/ABC News reports.

SCOTUS Rejects Appeal for Blocked N.C. Ultrasound Law

June 15, 2015 — The Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear an appeal from North Carolina over a partly blocked state law (SL 2011-45) that would require physicians to perform ultrasounds and describe the images to a woman before an abortion, AP/ABC News reports.

According to AP/ABC News, the high court did not take any action on a separate appeal over a blocked admitting privileges requirement (HB 1390) in Mississippi that, if permitted to take effect, could close the state's sole abortion clinic (AP/ABC News, 6/15).

Background

The North Carolina law, enacted in 2011, requires physicians to perform ultrasounds and display and describe the images to women seeking abortions, even if the women object. The requirement has never taken effect because of ongoing court challenges, although other provisions of the law remain in place.

Last year, a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously upheld a lower court's ruling that struck down the narrated ultrasound requirement, stating that the provision is an unconstitutional violation of physicians' free-speech rights.

In March, North Carolina requested that the Supreme Court consider the 4th Circuit's decision (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/1).

Details on SCOTUS Refusal

The Supreme Court's refusal to consider the appeal keeps intact the lower court's decision that held that the law violates physicians' free-speech rights.

However, the rejection does not affect other provisions in the law, including requirements that physicians provide state-mandated counseling to a woman prior to an abortion (Stohr, Bloomberg, 6/15).

Abortion-Rights Groups Praise Action

The Center for Reproductive Rights, the American Civil Liberties Union and Planned Parenthood Federation of America -- all of which filed the lawsuit challenging the North Carolina law -- praised the Supreme Court's decision not to review the case.

CRR President and CEO Nancy Northup said, "The Supreme Court has left standing major victories in the lower courts that will keep politicians out of the exam room and the personal decisions of North Carolina women seeking to safely and legally end a pregnancy."

Similarly, Jennifer Dalven, director of ACLU's Reproductive Freedom Project, praised the ruling. "In this country, [it is] not ok to turn doctors into the mouthpieces of politicians in order to make a woman feel bad about her decision" to have an abortion, she said.

PPFA President Cecile Richards said, "This dangerous and misguided law should never have passed in the first place. Politicians across the country should take note -- these harmful and unconstitutional restrictions won't be tolerated by the courts or the public" (CRR release, 6/15)


Op-Eds, Editorial Lambast Texas Ruling, Urge Supreme Court To Protect Abortion Access

Mon, 06/15/2015 - 15:36

A Washington Post editorial and opinion pieces from the Los Angeles Times and The Week examine the recent 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals' decision upholding parts of an omnibus antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) and urge the Supreme Court to overturn the ruling. Summaries of the pieces appear below.

Op-Eds, Editorial Lambast Texas Ruling, Urge Supreme Court To Protect Abortion Access

June 15, 2015 — A Washington Post editorial and opinion pieces from the Los Angeles Times and The Week examine the recent 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals' decision upholding parts of an omnibus antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) and urge the Supreme Court to overturn the ruling. Summaries of the pieces appear below.

~ Carla Hall, Los Angeles Times: The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals' decision to uphold "an onerous [Texas] law requirement that abortion clinics be outfitted to the standards of ambulatory surgical centers," after already upholding another provision requiring doctors who provide abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals, "will leave, at most, seven or eight clinics open in the entire state," down from the 41 that were in operation before the law was enacted, Hall, a reporter, writes. Hall notes, "There is absolutely no medical or health reason for doctors to have admitting privileges or for abortion clinics to be outfitted like hospitals, according to doctors, medical groups, women's healthcare advocates and the federal judges who have thrown out these unnecessary provisions through the years in various states." Rather, this legislation "is just about (unconstitutionally) making it difficult to get an abortion," she writes, noting that while clinics might remain open in "big urban areas," low-income women in rural parts of the state will have "to make a difficult journey of 200 miles or more in some cases to get to the few remaining clinics" (Hall, Los Angeles Times, 6/11).

~ Washington Post: A Post editorial calls on the Supreme Court to strike down the 5th Circuit decision, noting that if it "stands, states will be able to all but deny access to abortion on a phony pretext of concern for women's health." According to the Post, the 5th Circuit in its ruling opted "to respect Texas's fig-leaf justifications for a policy that is obviously designed to limit access to abortion, not to protect women's health." Further, the appeals court "put ideological preference ahead of constitutional dictates" when it determined that the law -- which would leave "nearly a million women ... farther than 150 miles from the nearest clinic" -- did not place a sufficiently "'substantial obstacle'" on women's access to the procedure, the editorial states. The editorial concludes, "Reasonable safety standards on medical procedures are warranted. Giving legal legitimacy to Texas's assault on abortion rights is not" (Washington Post, 6/11).

~ San Francisco Chronicle: "Abortion rights suffered a big setback [last] week when a federal appeals court upheld a Texas law that was designed to force the closure of abortion clinics," a Chronicle editorial states. According to the editorial, the state's existing abortion restrictions already have increased the number of Texas women going to Louisiana to access abortion care, and the latest ruling could close "10 of the state's 17 abortion clinics." However, the editorial notes that while "Texas politicians [might] have decided that restricting abortion is a winning issue for them ... the danger is that the Supreme Court will agree with them." The editorial states, "There are no guarantees that the justices will strike down these laws" in Texas or other states "that are designed specifically to prevent women from making their own health care choices" (San Francisco Chronicle, 6/11).

~ Rick Jervis, USA Today: While the 5th Circuit ruling, "if upheld, could shrink the number of Texas clinics ... to just seven in the nation's second-largest state," it could also have a "silver lining" if reviewed and overturned by the Supreme Court, Jervis writes. He explains that, according to abortion-rights advocates, a "Supreme Court hearing could lead to one of the most sweeping national rulings on abortion since Roe v. Wade ... and could roll back similar laws in states across the [U.S.]." Jervis acknowledges that such a ruling is "a big if," but he cites Elizabeth Nash -- senior state issues associate at the Guttmacher Institute -- noting that "the potential is certainly there" given that "[m]ore than 30 states currently have laws similar to Texas', including rules requiring abortion doctors to obtain admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and for clinics to meet ambulatory surgical centers standards" (Jervis, USA Today, 6/14).

~ Paul Waldman, The Week: "Depending on how" the Supreme Court might rule on the 5th Circuit ruling -- if the high court opts to review the case -- "we may find ourselves considerably farther down a road we're already traveling on reproductive rights: one in which we have two countries ... one where abortion is legal and one where it's technically legal, but all but impossible to obtain," Waldman writes. Waldman focuses on the Texas law's admitting privileges requirement, explaining how patients of physicians with or without such privileges would receive "pretty much exactly" the same hospital care, if ever needed. He contends that rather than helping women, this requirement has been used to put all but 18 of the state's 41 clinics out of business. He adds, "There are already four states with only a single clinic that performs abortions, and if the Supreme Court takes this case and rules the way conservatives hope, before you know it there will be many more" (Waldman, The Week, 6/11).


Texas Gov. Signs Bill Tightening Judicial Bypass Restrictions for Minors Seeking Abortion

Mon, 06/15/2015 - 14:45

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) on Friday signed a bill (HB 3994) imposing additional restrictions on minors seeking a court's permission to receive abortion care instead of obtaining parental consent for the procedure, AP/Dallas Morning News reports.

Texas Gov. Signs Bill Tightening Judicial Bypass Restrictions for Minors Seeking Abortion

June 15, 2015 — Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) on Friday signed a bill (HB 3994) imposing additional restrictions on minors seeking a court's permission to receive abortion care instead of obtaining parental consent for the procedure, AP/Dallas Morning News reports.

Abbott has scheduled a ceremony on July 8 to promote the legislation (AP/Dallas Morning News, 6/12).

Background

Prior to the new law, minors could apply for a judicial bypass in any Texas county. Minors seeking judicial bypass must prove at least one of three grounds: that they are well-informed and mature enough to obtain an abortion without parental notification; that it is not in their best interest to notify their parents of the procedure; or that notifying their parents would cause emotional, physical or sexual abuse.

HB 3994 requires minors to apply for bypass in their county of residence, an adjacent county if their home county has fewer than 10,000 residents or in the county in which they plan to have the procedure. In addition, the law increases the burden of proof that minors face when claiming that obtaining parental consent for abortion would lead to emotional, physical or sexual abuse.

Previously, judges were required to rule on such petitions within two days, at which time the request was considered approved absent a judge's ruling. Under HB 3994, a judge is required to rule on a minor's request within five days. The law does not provide any guidance on whether a request is granted or denied if a judge does not issue a ruling in that timeframe.

The law also requires physicians to assume pregnant women are minors and request they show proof of identification. However, physicians are allowed to provide abortion care without a woman providing an ID. In such cases, physicians are required to provide a report to the state on the abortion.

The law allows for civil penalties of up to $10,000 for any individual found to have "intentionally, knowingly, recklessly or with gross negligence" violated the measure (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/2).


Ore. Governor Signs Bill To Improve Contraceptive Access

Mon, 06/15/2015 - 14:29

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) on Thursday signed a bill (HB 3343) requiring insurers to cover a 12 months' supply of contraception in a single dispersal, the Huffington Post reports.

Ore. Governor Signs Bill To Improve Contraceptive Access

June 15, 2015 — Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) on Thursday signed a bill (HB 3343) requiring insurers to cover a 12-month supply of contraception in a single dispersal, the Huffington Post reports.

The law goes into effect Jan. 1, 2016 (Lachman, Huffington Post, 6/11). The legislation makes Oregon the first state in the U.S. in which insurers must cover one year's worth of contraception in a single batch (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/4).

Law Details

Under the new law, women must first obtain a three-month supply of birth control to ensure that they do not experience adverse reactions. They would then be able to fill subsequent prescriptions for 12-month supplies (Kumar, AP/ San Francisco Chronicle, 6/11).

Comments

Mary Nolan, interim executive director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon, said "the medical research was very clear that filling a yearlong prescription all at once is a significant contributor to improving the effectiveness of birth control" (Huffington Post, 6/11). PPAO has noted that providing birth control in a 12-month supply, compared with 30- or 90-day supplies, is linked to a 30% reduction in the risk of unintended pregnancy (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/4).

Nolan added that lawmakers in California, New York and Washington state are interested in the proposal. Meanwhile, Elizabeth Nash, senior state issues associate at the Guttmacher Institute, said Washington, D.C., lawmakers are considering similar legislation (AP/San Francisco Chronicle, 6/11).


AAMC To Launch National Pilot Program Aimed at Improving Transgender Health Care

Mon, 06/15/2015 - 14:26

The Association of American Medical Colleges in August will launch a national pilot program to address struggles transgender individuals face in the health care system, USA Today reports.

AAMC To Launch National Pilot Program Aimed at Improving Transgender Health Care

June 15, 2015 — The Association of American Medical Colleges in August will launch a national pilot program to address struggles transgender individuals face in the health care system, USA Today reports.

AAMC's guidelines are the first formal standards on transgender health care delivery for medical schools and health care providers, according to Kristen Eckstrand, chair of AAMC's Advisory Committee on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Sex Development.

Pilot Program Details

The pilot program will launch at the University of Louisville School of Medicine.

According to USA Today, AAMC's curriculum aims to train medical students about the unique health care issues facing individuals who are born with sex development differences, who are gender non-conforming, or who identify as bisexual, gay, lesbian or transgender.

The curriculum's guidelines include 30 competencies physicians must learn, including competencies in patient care and communication. According to USA Today, the competencies were drafted to be integrated into current curriculums to help individuals think of such patients as part of the overall patient population. For example, the competencies include real-life situations for students to talk about, such as how to interact with non-gender conforming children.

During a panel discussion at the University of Louisville on Thursday, Faye Jones, an assistant vice president at the school's Office of Diversity and Inclusion, said, "We're being looked at to see what works and what doesn't and to be a model for the nation."

She added, "This is a topic that has been taboo for a long time. Physicians want to provide the best care for these patients, but they may not be aware of issues and how to address someone in a culturally responsive manner" (Ungar, USA Today, 6/11).


Quote Round Up: Advocates Blast 'Devastat[ing]' Texas Ruling, Debunk Medically Inaccurate Abortion Restrictions, More

Fri, 06/12/2015 - 16:34

Media outlets and key stakeholders in women's health comment on the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision to uphold parts of Texas' omnibus antiabortion-rights bill, debunk the medical misinformation behind certain abortion restrictions and more.

Quote Round Up: Advocates Blast 'Devastat[ing]' Texas Ruling, Debunk Medically Inaccurate Abortion Restrictions, More

June 12, 2015 — Media outlets and key stakeholders in women's health comment on the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision to uphold parts of Texas' omnibus antiabortion-rights bill, debunk the medical misinformation behind certain abortion restrictions and more.

"Not since before Roe v. Wade has a law or court decision had the potential to devastate access to reproductive health care on such a sweeping scale." -- Nancy Northup, president and CEO of the Center for Reproductive Rights, on a ruling from the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that upheld major portions of a Texas antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/10). On Wednesday, CRR asked the 5th Circuit to stay its ruling while Texas abortion providers appeal the decision to the Supreme Court (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/11).

"[T]he idea of fetal pain is just the latest way the pro-life lobby is trying to reduce access to abortion." -- Columnist Latoya Peterson in an opinion piece for Fusion, explaining that 20-week abortion bans are based "on misinterpreted research that says fetuses can feel pain" at that point of development. She writes, "By pandering to an increasingly fringe minority, who will take any symbolic victory against abortion and leave the bodies of women in their wake, extremist lawmakers are willing to ignore medical facts and statistics and hurt women to advance their cause" (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/29).

"Because (Idaho's law) places an arbitrary time limit on when women can obtain abortions, the statute is unconstitutional." -- 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Harry Pregerson, overturning Idaho's 20-week abortion ban (The Hill, 5/29). The appeals court also struck down restrictions in the state that require abortions performed during the second trimester to take place at a hospital (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/1).

"[W]omen should be able to get the comprehensive health care they need when they need it, without being charged extra, without asking permission and without politicians interfering." -- Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), on a measure (S 1532) she proposed that would require insurance companies to cover oral contraceptives approved by the FDA for over-the-counter use (Women's Health Policy Report, 9/10).

"We're going to continue the program, first and foremost." -- Larry Wolk, Colorado's chief medical officer and executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, pledging to keep in place a state program that helps low-income women access long-acting reversible contraception. State lawmakers did not approve $5 million in funding for the program, but Wolk has said he is in discussions with in- and out-of-state foundations to procure additional funding (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/2).

"This is about protecting the health and safety of women." -- California Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins (D), on a bill (AB 775) passed by the chamber that aims to protect women from receiving certain misleading information from crisis pregnancy centers. The bill now heads to the state Senate for consideration (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/27).

"[I]f you're a woman counting on a constitutional right to an abortion, your access to one may increasingly depend on your county or zip code." -- Columnist Rebecca Ruiz in a Mashable opinion piece, discussing the barrage of state legislation designed to restrict women's access to abortion. Ruiz notes that as lawsuits over these restrictions move through the courts, often with "different outcomes depending on geography, it has become clear that only the Supreme Court can truly address the growing disparities in access to abortion" (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/21).

"We call for age-appropriate, medically accurate, evidence-informed and comprehensive school-based sexual health education for young people." -- Richard Carmona, Joycelyn Elders and David Satcher -- the 17th, 15th and 16th U.S. surgeons general, respectively -- discussing the need for comprehensive sexuality education in the U.S. (Washington Post, 5/22). The surgeons general note that despite some improvements in sexual health, the U.S. "continues to have one of the highest teen birth rates and some of the highest rates of sexually transmitted [infection] in the industrialized world" (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/27).

Blogs Comment on Ramifications of Texas Ruling, OTC Contraception Coverage Bill, More

Fri, 06/12/2015 - 16:31

Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress," RH Reality Check and more.

Blogs Comment on Ramifications of Texas Ruling, OTC Contraception Coverage Bill, More

June 12, 2015 — Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress," RH Reality Check and more.

TEXAS: "The Fifth Circuit Just Stuck a Knife in Roe v. Wade," Ian Millhiser, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": The ruling by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to uphold a restrictive Texas antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) that "that will shut down most of the state's abortion clinics" also "would give many other states broad discretion to restrict access to abortion if its reasoning is ultimately adopted by the Supreme Court," Millhiser writes. He explains that the 5th Circuit opinion "could effectively render what remains of Roe v. Wade a dead letter, at least in the context of facial legal challenges," because it interprets the 2007 Supreme Court decision in Gonzales v. Carhart so as to prevent "future plaintiffs' ability to challenge abortion bans disguised as sham health laws." Specifically, the appeals court held that "'medical uncertainty underlying a statute is for resolution by legislatures, not the courts,' even when a sham health law such as HB2 is challenged," Millhiser writes. Noting the law likely will be appealed to the Supreme Court, Millhiser writes that "the fate of the law will likely rest with the author of Gonzales v. Carhart, Justice Anthony Kennedy" (Millhiser, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 6/9).

What others are saying about Texas:

~ "Texas Abortion Providers Set Their Sights on the Supreme Court," Andrea Grimes, RH Reality Check.

CONTRACEPTION: "Senate Democrats Propose 'Affordability Is Access' Bill for Over-the-Counter Birth Control," Emily Crockett, RH Reality Check: "Senate Democrats unveiled a proposal Tuesday to make sure that if" some contraceptives become available over-the-counter, "women can still get birth control through their insurance without paying extra," Crockett writes. The Affordability is Access Act (S 1532), introduced by Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), "would require insurance companies to cover birth control pills without cost-sharing from patients if [FDA] decides they can be made available without a prescription." According to Crockett, the bill comes in response to a measure (S 1438) introduced by conservatives in the Senate that would "encourage birth control manufacturers to apply for OTC status," which "[w]omen's health advocates and health care providers" dismissed as "a 'sham' and a cynical attempt to undermine the no-copay birth control benefit" required under the Affordable Care Act (PL 111-148) (Crockett, RH Reality Check, 6/10).

What others are saying about contraception:

~ "Birth Control May Soon Be Way More Accessible in California," Emma Niles, Ms. Magazine blog.

LGBT: "New Guidance is a Step Forward for Transgender Health," Kelli Garcia, National Women's Law Center's "Womenstake": "[M]any transgender people still struggle just to get basic health care," which is "why recent administrative guidance stating that health insurance companies cannot limit coverage of preventive services based on a person's gender, gender identity, or recorded gender is so important," Garcia writes. She notes that some insurers "were denying coverage" for certain medication procedures "because of a person's gender identity." Specifically, she explains that because "[r]ecommendations for medical services are often based on sex," insurance companies could deny claims for services traditionally ascribed to one gender, such as prostate exams for transgender women. "The new guidance addresses this problem" by "mak[ing] clear that coverage should be based on medical need -- not gender identity," she writes, adding, "According to the guidance, if a provider finds that a preventive service, such as a mammogram or a pap smear for a transgender man, is appropriate the insurer must cover the service regardless of the gender indicated in the plan documents." However, Garcia notes that while this guidance is a good "first step," it "doesn't address another pervasive form of discrimination -- insurance plans' refusal to cover transition related services" (Garcia, "Womenstake," National Women's Law Center, 6/10).

CRIMINALIZING PREGNANCY: "Women Are Being Arrested and Jailed for Self-Abortion," Michelle Goldberg, The Nation: Goldberg discusses a growing pattern in which pregnant women are being arrested and criminally charged for trying to perform their own abortions, a trend that she notes will "only ... get worse ... as more and more clinics close and more anti-abortion laws are passed." For example, she writes that Kenlissa Jones, a "23-year-old Georgia woman," was charged with murder earlier this week after she allegedly consumed a drug purchased online to end her pregnancy. Goldberg notes that although the charge was later dropped -- Jones "is still being charged with possession of a dangerous drug" -- the case is similar to others, such as Purvi Patel and a case in Arkansas in which a woman was attempting her own abortion using drugs obtained from a nurse. "With abortion access being severely and inexorably eroded all over the country, it has become clear that black-market abortion drugs are the modern version of the old back-alley procedures," she writes. However, she notes that, unlike the situation prior to Roe v. Wade, "police and prosecutors who'd emerged from the anti-abortion movement" are "eager to treat" abortion as murder (Goldberg, The Nation, 6/10).

20-WEEK BAN: "Lindsey Graham Declares War on Science -- and the Constitution: What His 20-Week Abortion Ban Is Really All About," Katie McDonough, Salon: Sen. Lindsey Graham's proposed 20-week abortion ban (S 1553), like a companion bill in the House and certain state bans, "cuts off access to the procedure pre-viability as a direct challenge to Roe v. Wade" and "uses inaccuracies about fetal pain as its political centerpiece," McDonough writes. She explains the bill is a revised version of a measure Graham introduced last year, which switches out a police reporting requirement for rape survivors with a requirement that they "seek mandatory counseling" before receiving an abortion, "a change that amounts to a backdoor waiting period." Further, she notes the idea of fetal pain "has been disputed by nearly every major medical association, including the American Medical Association and the British Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and smaller studies from researchers at Harvard University, University College London and other institutions," as well as "the very doctors cited by [conservatives] to give cover to these pre-viability bans." The bans also "deny people access to vital reproductive healthcare" because many fetal anomalies cannot be detected until later in a pregnancy, McDonough writes (McDonough, Salon, 6/11).


20-Week Abortion Ban Introduced in the Senate

Fri, 06/12/2015 - 15:55

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Thursday introduced a bill (S 1553) that would ban abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy, the Huffington Post reports.

20-Week Abortion Ban Introduced in the Senate

June 12, 2015 — Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Thursday introduced a bill (S 1553) that would ban abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy, the Huffington Post reports (Bassett, Huffington Post, 6/11).

Background

The move comes after the House last month voted 242-184 to pass a companion bill (HB 36).

House leaders originally planned to vote on a version of the bill on Jan. 22 -- the 42nd anniversary of the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision -- but changed course after some conservative lawmakers raised concerns about a requirement that a rape survivor would have to formally report the rape to police to obtain an abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/14).

Bill Details

The Senate measure is similar to the House bill. Specifically, the Senate bill still would require adult rape survivors to meet strict restrictions before obtaining abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Specifically, abortion care only would be permitted if the woman receives counseling or medical care at least 48 hours before the procedure.

Meanwhile, the bill maintains reporting requirements for rape or incest survivors who are minors, allowing them to obtain abortion care after 20 weeks of pregnancy only if the incident has been reported to a law enforcement agency or social services. The bill would not provide exemptions in cases of incest for adults (Fram, AP/Yahoo! News, 6/11).

The legislation also includes provisions that would require women seeking abortion later in pregnancy to sign an "informed consent" form and make physicians who violate the legislation liable for civil action. Criminal penalties, including up to five years' imprisonment, are also permitted for certain violations (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/14).

The Senate version of the legislation currently has 42 co-sponsors, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) (Sullivan, The Hill, 6/11).

Next Steps

The measure faces opposition among abortion-rights supporters in the Senate, and President Obama has said he will veto the bill should it gain congressional approval (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/14). According to the Huffington Post, the legislation likely does not have the support to overcome a Senate filibuster by supporters of abortion rights (Huffington Post, 6/11).

However, Graham said he hoped introducing the measure would result in debate over the issue, even if the measure does not become law (The Hill, 6/11). He said he would "insist" on the measure receiving a vote in the Senate.

Reaction

Mark DeFrancesco, president of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists on Thursday said he is strongly opposed to the legislation.

He said, "As an ob-gyn, I know firsthand the reasons why women may need abortion care after 20 weeks, and I have seen the pain that many of these women are in when confronting these decisions. Yet this ban would force physicians to deny services, even to women who have made the difficult decision to end pregnancies for reasons including fetal anomalies diagnosed later in pregnancy or other unexpected obstetric outcomes." DeFrancesco added, "This is simply cruel."

Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) said, "I'm calling on [conservative] leaders to drop this dangerous political attack, listen to women across the country who have made clear they don't need a politician at their doctor's appointments, and focus on the real challenges our country faces" (Huffington Post, 6/11).


Study: Medication and Surgical Abortion Equally Effective During First Trimester

Fri, 06/12/2015 - 15:49

Medication and surgical abortions are equally effective during the first trimester, and both procedures have very low rates of complications, according to a study published last week in Obstetrics & Gynecology, MedPage Today's "The Gupta Guide" reports.

Study: Medication and Surgical Abortion Equally Effective During First Trimester

June 12, 2015 — Medication and surgical abortions are equally effective during the first trimester, and both procedures have very low rates of complications, according to a study published last week in Obstetrics & Gynecology, MedPage Today's "The Gupta Guide" reports.

The study analyzed the electronic health records of more than 30,000 women seeking abortion before 64 days of gestation from Planned Parenthood Los Angeles between November 2010 and August 2013. Of these women, 13,221 underwent medication abortion and 16,925 underwent surgical abortion.

Key Findings

The researchers found that medication abortion during the first 64 days of pregnancy had an efficacy rate of 99.6%, while the efficacy rate of surgical abortion during that timeframe was 99.8%, making the methods nearly identical in terms of effectiveness.

The researchers noted that while only 1.9% of patients overall reported adverse events -- such as continued pregnancy, ongoing symptoms or unanticipated aspiration -- medication abortion patients were more likely to report such events than surgical abortion patients.

According to the researchers, only 1.3% of all study participants required unanticipated aspiration to resolve bleeding, pain or continued pregnancy. When divided by procedure, they found that 2.1% of medication abortion patients required surgical follow-up care to complete the abortion or resolve other procedure-related complications, compared with 0.6% of surgical abortion patients.

More specifically, they found that 1.8% of medication abortion patients underwent an unanticipated aspiration to resolve pain or bleeding, compared with 0.4% of those who received surgical abortion. Meanwhile, the study found that only 0.4% of women receiving a medication abortion and 0.1% of surgical abortion patients required unanticipated aspiration for an abortion failure.

According to the study, patient age and gestational age both were found to have an effect on the risk of unanticipated aspiration. The researchers found that the risk of unanticipated aspiration increased by 3% for each year of patient age. Meanwhile, they found that every week of gestational age increased the risk of unanticipated aspiration among women in the medication abortion group, while every week of gestational age decreased the risk for women in the surgical abortion group ("The Gupta Guide," MedPage Today, 6/10).


Ark. AG Appeals Decision Overturning 12-Week Abortion Ban

Fri, 06/12/2015 - 14:55

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge (R) on Wednesday asked the full 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear a ruling that struck down part of a state law (Act 301) prohibiting abortion after 12 weeks of pregnancy if a fetal heartbeat is detectable, the AP/San Francisco Chronicle reports.

Ark. AG Appeals Decision Overturning 12-Week Abortion Ban

June 12, 2015 — Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge (R) on Wednesday asked the full 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear a ruling that struck down part of a state law (Act 301) prohibiting abortion after 12 weeks of pregnancy if a fetal heartbeat is detectable, the AP/San Francisco Chronicle reports (AP/San Francisco Chronicle, 6/10).

Background

The Center for Reproductive Rights and the American Civil Liberties Union filed suit in April 2013 against the Arkansas law. The measure includes exceptions in cases of rape, incest, to save a woman's life or when the fetus has a fatal disorder.

In March 2014, a federal judge struck down part of Arkansas' law, ruling that restricting abortion based on fetal heartbeat rather than viability is unconstitutional. However, the judge left in place parts of the law that require physicians to perform an ultrasound and tell a woman if a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

In May, a three-judge panel of the 8th Circuit ruled that the Arkansas law's abortion ban is unconstitutional because it violates Supreme Court precedent that permits women to have an abortion before fetal viability. The court left in place provisions in the law that mandate that physicians tell a woman if a fetal heartbeat can be detected (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/28).

Comments

Rutledge expressed her support for the legislation and said it was her "duty to defend this law."

Meanwhile, Rita Sklar, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Arkansas, said she did not think the appeal would succeed. "The three-judge panel of the appeals court agreed with the U.S. Supreme Court precedent, which made it clear that abortions [are] constitutional up to the point of viability, and 12 weeks is not viability," she said (AP/San Francisco Chronicle, 6/10).


Quote Round Up: Advocates Blast 'Devastat[ing]' Texas Ruling, Debunk Medically Inaccurate Abortion Restrictions, More

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 19:03

Media outlets and key stakeholders in women's health comment on the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision to uphold parts of Texas' omnibus antiabortion-rights bill, debunk the medical misinformation behind certain abortion restrictions and more.

Quote Round Up: Advocates Blast 'Devastat[ing]' Texas Ruling, Debunk Medically Inaccurate Abortion Restrictions, More

June 11, 2015 — Media outlets and key stakeholders in women's health comment on the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision to uphold parts of Texas' omnibus antiabortion-rights bill, debunk the medical misinformation behind certain abortion restrictions and more.

"Not since before Roe v. Wade has a law or court decision had the potential to devastate access to reproductive health care on such a sweeping scale." -- Nancy Northup, president and CEO of the Center for Reproductive Rights, on a ruling from the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that upheld major portions of a Texas antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/10). On Wednesday, CRR asked the 5th Circuit to stay its ruling while Texas abortion providers appeal the decision to the Supreme Court (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/11).

"[T]he idea of fetal pain is just the latest way the pro-life lobby is trying to reduce access to abortion." -- Columnist Latoya Peterson in an opinion piece for Fusion, explaining that 20-week abortion bans are based "on misinterpreted research that says fetuses can feel pain" at that point of development. She writes, "By pandering to an increasingly fringe minority, who will take any symbolic victory against abortion and leave the bodies of women in their wake, extremist lawmakers are willing to ignore medical facts and statistics and hurt women to advance their cause" (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/29).

"Because (Idaho's law) places an arbitrary time limit on when women can obtain abortions, the statute is unconstitutional." -- 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Harry Pregerson, overturning Idaho's 20-week abortion ban (The Hill, 5/29). The appeals court also struck down restrictions in the state that require abortions performed during the second trimester to take place at a hospital (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/1).

"[W]omen should be able to get the comprehensive health care they need when they need it, without being charged extra, without asking permission and without politicians interfering." -- Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), on a measure (S 1532) she proposed that would require insurance companies to cover oral contraceptives approved by the FDA for over-the-counter use (Women's Health Policy Report, 9/10).

"We're going to continue the program, first and foremost." -- Larry Wolk, Colorado's chief medical officer and executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, pledging to keep in place a state program that helps low-income women access long-acting reversible contraception. State lawmakers did not approve $5 million in funding for the program, but Wolk has said he is in discussions with in- and out-of-state foundations to procure additional funding (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/2).

"This is about protecting the health and safety of women." -- California Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins (D), on a bill (AB 775) passed by the chamber that aims to protect women from receiving certain misleading information from crisis pregnancy centers. The bill now heads to the state Senate for consideration (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/27).

"[I]f you're a woman counting on a constitutional right to an abortion, your access to one may increasingly depend on your county or zip code." -- Columnist Rebecca Ruiz in a Mashable opinion piece, discussing the barrage of state legislation designed to restrict women's access to abortion. Ruiz notes that as lawsuits over these restrictions move through the courts, often with "different outcomes depending on geography, it has become clear that only the Supreme Court can truly address the growing disparities in access to abortion" (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/21).

"We call for age-appropriate, medically accurate, evidence-informed and comprehensive school-based sexual health education for young people." -- Richard Carmona, Joycelyn Elders and David Satcher -- the 17th, 15th and 16th U.S. surgeons general, respectively -- discussing the need for comprehensive sexuality education in the U.S. (Washington Post, 5/22). The surgeons general note that despite some improvements in sexual health, the U.S. "continues to have one of the highest teen birth rates and some of the highest rates of sexually transmitted [infection] in the industrialized world" (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/27).