Daily Women's Health Policy Report

  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
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Daily Women's Health Policy Report by the National Partnership for Women & Families
Updated: 15 min 23 sec ago

W.Va. House Votes To Override Veto of 20-Week Abortion Ban

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:26

The West Virginia House on Wednesday morning voted 77-16 to override a veto of a bill (HB 2568) that would ban abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, the West Virginia State Journal reports. The bill now heads to the state Senate for an override attempt.

W.Va. House Votes To Override Veto of 20-Week Abortion Ban

March 4, 2015 — The West Virginia House on Wednesday morning voted 77-16 to override a veto of a bill (HB 2568) that would ban abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, the West Virginia State Journal reports. The bill now heads to the state Senate for an override attempt (Cardosi, West Virginia State Journal, 3/4).

West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin (D) vetoed the bill on Tuesday, marking the second year in a row that he has rejected such legislation (Kabler, Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

Bill Details and Background

Tomblin said in a statement that he vetoed the measure on the grounds that it is unconstitutional. The Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade said that states cannot ban abortion before fetal viability, which is considered around 24 weeks of pregnancy (Bassett, Huffington Post, 3/3).

"At the start of the regular session, I urged members of the Legislature to consider a compromise that would help us establish legislation that would pass constitutional muster," Tomblin said in the veto message, adding, "Having received a substantially similar bill to the one vetoed last year on constitutional grounds, I must veto House Bill 2568" (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

The bill is based on the premise that fetuses can feel pain at 20 weeks gestation. However, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has said that there is no legitimate scientific evidence showing that fetuses are capable of feeling pain at 20 weeks.

The bill would allow exceptions to the ban for medical emergencies but not for instances when the woman faces severe psychological distress. Physicians who violate the measure would not face any criminal penalties, but they could have their medical licenses suspended or revoked (Women's Health Policy Report, 2/26).

Veto Override Effort

According to the State Journal, the state Legislature has two days after a veto to attempt to override it (West Virginia State Journal, 3/4).

An override requires a simple majority vote in both chambers. The bill passed the state House 87-21 and the state Senate 29-5 earlier this year (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

Comments

State House Speaker Tim Armstead (R) said he was "disappointed" that Tomblin vetoed the bill. Armstead added that he "believe[s] the legislation is constitutionally sound and represents the right public policy in our state" (West Virginia State Journal, 3/4).

However, WV Free Executive Director Margaret Chapman Pomponio said the governor made the right decision. She noted that veto override could set the stage for a costly legal battle over the legislation, adding, "The idea of dragging taxpayers through an unconstitutional fight is unthinkable" (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

Planned Parenthood South Atlantic Vice President Melissa Reed said, "The reality is that abortion later in pregnancy is very rare and often happens in complex circumstances where a wanted pregnancy has gone tragically wrong," adding, "These are the kind of situations where a woman and her doctor need every medical option available" (Huffington Post, 3/3).

Meanwhile, West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey (R) said in a statement Tuesday that he would defend the measure if it is challenged in court. "It is long-past time that limits are placed on abortions in West Virginia," he said, adding, "While no one can predict with certainty how a court will rule, I believe that there are strong, good-faith arguments that this legislation is constitutional and should be upheld by the courts" (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).


Ohio Abortion Restrictions Strain Providers, Limit Access for Patients

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:24

Measures that restrict abortion in Ohio have made it harder for women in the state to access the procedure, NPR's "Shots" reports.

Ohio Abortion Restrictions Strain Providers, Limit Access for Patients

March 4, 2015 — Measures that restrict abortion in Ohio have made it harder for women in the state to access the procedure, NPR's "Shots" reports.

State Abortion Restrictions

Several antiabortion-rights laws have passed in the state since 2011. In that time, the number of clinics has dropped from 16 to eight. According to "Shots," some of the closings are connected to the laws, while one was related to safety violations and another was for business reasons.

One of the state's antiabortion-rights measures requires women to consult with a physician in person and then wait 24 hours before undergoing the procedure. As a result, women must either stay overnight near the clinic or make two trips, "Shots" reports (Ludden, "Shots," NPR, 3/3).

Another Ohio law (HB 78) bans abortions at 24 weeks and requires physicians to perform tests to determine if a fetus is viable beginning at 20 weeks. The law states that a physician cannot perform an abortion between 20 weeks and 24 weeks unless a woman's life is at risk or the physician has determined that the fetus cannot survives outside the womb (Women's Health Policy Report, 1/28).

In addition, provisions in the state budget require abortion clinics to secure a transfer agreement with a private hospital and prohibit them from making such arrangements with public hospitals (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/1/13). According to "Shots," many private hospitals are hesitant to grant such agreements to abortion providers because they are Catholic-affiliated or for other reasons.

Restrictions Strain Providers, Limit Abortion Access

Kellie Copeland, executive director for NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio, said that the clinic restrictions are wearing on providers. Specifically, she noted that the 20-week testing requirement has driven some clinics to stop offering abortions after that time frame, while the transfer agreement rules have placed clinics "in this Catch-22 that really doesn't have anything to do with patient care."

Separately, Chrisse France, executive director of Preterm, an abortion clinic in Cleveland, said the caseload at her clinic has increased by 10% since the restrictions began. "We are more fully booked," she said.

France also noted the clinic is seeing women who travel from farther away, as clinics in locations closer to them have closed, "Shots" reports. She added that finding child care "and transportation are often big issues" for patients trying to comply with the 24-hour mandatory delay requirement.

Further, some women are leaving the state to obtain abortion care, as Ohio restricts the use of medication abortion, "Shots" reports. According to "Shots," roughly one-fourth of women who chose to have an abortion opt for a medication abortion.

Copeland noted that abortion restrictions will not stop women from seeking to end their pregnancies. "At no time in history, nowhere around the globe did outlawing abortion mean women stopped having them," she said, adding, "What it meant is [abortions] became dangerous."

Antiabortion-Rights Efforts Continue

Meanwhile, antiabortion-rights advocates have begun discussing several new abortion restrictions, including a stricter 20-week ban, a measure that would ban abortion in the case of a Down syndrome diagnosis and a fetal "heartbeat" bill (HB 69) that could ban the procedure as early as six weeks into pregnancy, "Shots" reports.

Ohio Right to Life President Mike Gonidakis said, "Our goal ultimately is to live in a society where abortion is no longer even considered" ("Shots," NPR, 3/3).


Ore. Lawmakers Announce Comprehensive Women's Health Bill

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:23

A group of Oregon lawmakers on Friday announced legislation aimed at closing gaps in reproductive health care coverage for women in the state, the Portland Business Journal reports.

Ore. Lawmakers Announce Comprehensive Women's Health Bill

March 2, 2015 — A group of Oregon lawmakers on Friday announced legislation aimed at closing gaps in reproductive health care coverage for women in the state, the Portland Business Journal reports.

The measure, called the Comprehensive Women's Health Bill, would require all health plans in the state to cover abortion, contraceptives and maternity care. It would also require health plans to cover a twelve-month supply of birth control dispensed at one time. Democratic state Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, Sen. Sara Gelser, Rep. Alissa Keny-Guyer and Rep. Barbara Smith Warner said they will introduce the bill.

Michele Stranger Hunter, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon and the Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health, said, "As states across the country are stripping women of reproductive health services and coverage, Oregon is making strides to ensure that [our] residents ... are healthy by providing a full range of reproductive health care."

Separately, Aimee Santos-Lyons, gender justice director at the Western States Center, urged Oregon lawmakers "to swiftly pass the Comprehensive Women's Health Bill," which will "fil[l] the gaps in our current laws so that Oregonians will be covered for [their] reproductive health needs regardless of income, how they are insured or where they live" (Thompson, Portland Business Journal, 2/27).


Study: Over-the-Counter Birth Control Without Cost-Sharing Would Reduce Unintended Pregnancies

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:22

Making birth control pills available without a prescription or out-of-pocket costs could reduce the number of unintended pregnancies among low-income women by 7% to 25%, according to a study published in Contraception, Medical Daily reports.

Study: Over-the-Counter Birth Control Without Cost-Sharing Would Reduce Unintended Pregnancies

March 3, 2015 — Making birth control pills available without a prescription or out-of-pocket costs could reduce the number of unintended pregnancies among low-income women by 7% to 25%, according to a study published in Contraception, Medical Daily reports (Bushak, Medical Daily, 2/27).

Researchers from the University of California-San Francisco and Ibis Reproductive Health collaborated on the study. They projected scenarios in which women would be able to obtain birth control pills at a pharmacy without a prescription and have the cost covered by insurance (Bassett, Huffington Post, 2/27).

Key Findings

About 11% to 12% more women would use the pill if it could be obtained at a pharmacy without a prescription or out-of-pocket costs, the researchers estimated. The increase in pill use would reduce the number of women who do not use contraception or who only rely on condoms by about 20% to 36%, resulting in a reduction in unintended pregnancies.

Study co-author Dan Grossman explained, "Women who are currently using methods that are less effective than the pill -- mainly condoms or nothing -- would use it," adding, "Particularly low-income women" (Medical Daily, 2/27).

Grossman noted that although the Affordable Care Act (PL 111-148) has expanded access to contraceptive coverage without cost-sharing, "there is still a need for over-the-counter birth control to fill the gap when women run out of pills while traveling, for example, or for those who find it inconvenient to get to a clinic." He added, "But to reach the largest number of women most in need, it's critical that a future [over-the-counter] pill be covered by insurance" (Huffington Post, 2/27).


Blogs Discuss Ore. Bill To Protect Repro Health, Why Abortion Costs More for Low-Income Women, More

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:21

Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at RH Reality Check, Feministing and more.

Blogs Discuss Ore. Bill To Protect Repro Health, Why Abortion Costs More for Low-Income Women, More

February 27, 2015 — Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at RH Reality Check, Feministing and more.

ABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "Oregon Bill Would Ensure Coverage for Reproductive Health Care, Abortions," Nina Liss-Schultz, RH Reality Check: Oregon lawmakers on Thursday proposed legislation that "would make Oregon the first state in the nation to ensure every state resident is covered for every type of reproductive health care, including abortion, under all forms of insurance," Liss-Schultz writes. According to Liss-Schultz, the bill is "part of a larger progressive legislative effort ... that will also tackle sexual assault and domestic violence issues." Specifically, the bill would require all insurers to "cover contraception, abortion, prenatal care, childbirth, and postpartum care, including breast-feeding support and folic acid without prescription," she explains. Further, she writes that the bill would bar insurers "from imposing cost-sharing for abortions at more than 10 percent of the cost of the procedure"; prohibit "deductibles for abortions ... altogether"; and "strengthe[n] and protec[t] existing abortion coverage under [the Oregon Health Plan] by removing it from the annual budget and codifying such coverage" (Liss-Schultz, RH Reality Check, 2/26).

What others are saying about the abortion rights movement:

~ "Texans Demand 'Trust. Respect. Access.' From Lawmakers on Reproductive Health," Andrea Grimes, RH Reality Check.

~ "76-Year-Old Texas Man Bikes 300 Miles To Raise Money for Planned Parenthood," Jenny Kutner, Salon.

ABORTION RESTRICTIONS: "The Cost of Getting an Abortion is Higher if You're Poor," Maya Dusenbery, Feministing: Dusenbery highlights two recent analyses that demonstrate how "[w]hen trying to get an abortion ... it's very expensive to be poor." She writes that a Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress" report "estimates that 'the process of obtaining an abortion'" in Wisconsin, which has fewer than five abortion clinics and mandates that women take "two trips to the clinic to get an abortion" could be "'up to $1,380 for a low-income single mother saddled with charges related to gas, a hotel stay, childcare, and taking time off work.'" By comparison, she notes the analysis found that the cost would be about $590 "[f]or a middle-income woman living comfortably in a city with no children and public transit options to the clinic," which is not "even accounting for the fact that the middle-income woman might have insurance that covers the procedure, while the low-income woman's Medicaid definitely won't." Dusenbery adds that a recent RH Reality Check analysis found that "the abortion price tag for a poor woman living in Texas's Rio Grande Valley is similar: up to $1,599, not to mention a seven-hour round-trip drive" (Dusenbery, Feministing, 2/26).

What others are saying about abortion restrictions:

~ "Arkansas Governor Signs Telemedicine Abortion Ban," Teddy Wilson, RH Reality Check.

CONTRACEPTION: "The Birth Control Method That Doctors Want To Use Themselves," Tara Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": Culp-Ressler writes about the findings of a new study published in Contraception showing that "[w]omen's health providers are more than three times as likely," at about 42%, "to select a long-acting reversible contraceptive -- like an [intrauterine device] or an implant -- than the general population." Culp-Ressler adds that the high use among the providers "makes sense, considering the fact that IUDs have been hailed as the 'best birth control' out there" and have been "enthusiastically endorsed by pediatricians and gynecologists alike." Culp-Ressler notes that the researchers suggested sharing the findings of higher LARC use by women's health providers with their patients, "'while maintaining patient choice and autonomy,'" as a means of "spreading the word about " IUDs' benefits (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 2/24).

ABORTION PROVIDERS AND ACCESS: "Hot Off the Press! Our Published Research on Training and Access," Reproductive Health Access Project blog: The Reproductive Health Access Project highlights findings from its "annual survey of family medicine residents trained in abortion care." According to RHAP, the survey found that "[t]raining in abortion in family medicine residency leads to intention to provide"; "[t]here is a dose-response relationship for training to intention to provide manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) and medication abortion"; there is a strong correlation for "[m]ore complex procedures ... between the number of procedures [performed] and future intention to provide the service"; and "[e]xposure to different abortion procedures has a cumulative impact on the likelihood that the resident intends to provide MVA and medication abortion in the future." RHAP says the findings show that abortion training for family physicians needs to be expanded to ensure reproductive health care is "accessible to everyone" (RHAP blog, 2/25).


House Cancels Plans To Vote on Education Bill With Antiabortion-Rights Amendment

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:19

House lawmakers on Friday canceled plans to vote on an education bill (HR 5) that included a provision that would withhold federal funding from school districts where school-based health centers provide abortion-related information, Politico reports.

House Cancels Plans To Vote on Education Bill With Antiabortion-Rights Amendment

March 2, 2015 — House lawmakers on Friday canceled plans to vote on an education bill (HR 5) that included a provision that would withhold federal funding from school districts where school-based health centers provide abortion-related information, Politico reports (Severns, Politico, 2/27).

According to CQ Roll Call, several factors contributed to House leaders' decision to delay the vote, including lawmakers' desire to prioritize consideration of funding for the Department of Homeland Security, growing conservative opposition to certain provisions and uncertainty over whether the measure would pass. House lawmakers had finished working on the underlying bill and amendments (Phenicie, CQ Roll Call, 2/27).

Democrats opposed the bill, and President Obama has said he would veto it if it reaches his desk, the AP/Sacramento Bee reports (Hefling, AP/Sacramento Bee, 2/27).

Background

House conservatives used a "manager's amendment" to add the abortion-related language to the Student Success Act, which aims to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act (PL 107-110). Manager's amendments typically are used to make uncontroversial tweaks to legislation.

The amendment, authored by Rep. Randy Neugebauer (R-Texas), would require school-based health centers in school districts that receive federal funding to certify that they do not provide information to students about abortion or perform abortions, even though school-based health centers already do not provide abortion services.

In addition, the bill would prohibit the health centers from providing students with "abortion related materials, referrals or directions" (Women's Health Policy Report, 2/27).

Next Steps

Senior Republican officials said they were not sure when a vote on the bill might occur, the AP/Bee reports (AP/Sacramento Bee, 2/27).

House Education and Workforce Committee Chair John Kline (R-Minn.) said he "expect[s]" that House lawmakers "will have an opportunity to finish this important work soon." Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Ind.), chair of the committee's Elementary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, said he is "confident" that lawmakers "will continue this effort in the coming weeks" (CQ Roll Call, 2/27).

Meanwhile, Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Chair Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and ranking member Rep. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) are working on their own legislation to overhaul NCLB (AP/Sacramento Bee, 2/27).


FDA Approves New Hormonal IUD

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:17

FDA on Friday approved the hormonal intrauterine device Liletta, which prevents pregnancy as effectively as sterilization for up to three years, Reuters reports.

FDA Approves New Hormonal IUD

March 2, 2015 — FDA on Friday approved the hormonal intrauterine device Liletta, which prevents pregnancy as effectively as sterilization for up to three years, Reuters reports.

The device is already used in Europe and is expected to be available in the U.S. in the next few months.

Device Details

Liletta prevents pregnancy by releasing levonorgestrel, a hormone that stops the uterine lining from thickening. The device also can be used to address heavy menstrual bleeding.

Under the FDA approval, a woman can use Liletta for up to three years before a replacement is necessary. A large trial is underway to determine if it could be used for up to seven years.

Long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include IUDs and implants, are more effective at preventing pregnancy than birth control pills and patches. Some IUDs are effective for up to 12 years.

Liletta will be marketed in the U.S. by Medicines360. Other IUDs available in the U.S. include Bayer AG's Mirena and Skyla hormonal IUDs and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries' Paragard copper IUD (Kareen Nair/Grover, Reuters, 2/27).


Report: Low-Income Women Less Likely Than More Affluent Women To Access Abortion, Use Contraception

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:15

Unmarried, low-income women ages 15 to 44 are far less likely than those with incomes of more than 400% of the federal poverty level to use contraception and have an abortion, but they are more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy, according to a Brookings Institution study, Vox reports.

Report: Low-Income Women Less Likely Than More Affluent Women To Access Abortion, Use Contraception

March 3, 2015 — Unmarried, low-income women ages 15 to 44 are far less likely than those with incomes of more than 400% of the federal poverty level to use contraception and have an abortion, but they are more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy, according to a Brookings Institution study, Vox reports (Kliff, Vox, 2/27).

For the report, researchers analyzed 2011-2013 data from the National Survey of Family Growth (Reeves/Venator, Brookings Institution, February 2015).

Key Findings

The report found that women across all income levels were equally likely to have had sex in the past year.

However, Brookings researchers Joanna Venator and Richard Reeves found that about 16% of women with incomes below the poverty level said they had sex without contraception during the past year, compared with 7.9% of women with incomes of more than 400% of FPL.

In addition, the report found that lower-income women were less likely to have an abortion than higher-income women. Specifically, 8.6% of women with incomes below the poverty level had an abortion, compared with 31.9% of women with incomes above 400% of FPL.

Further, the report found that 9% of women with incomes below the poverty level said they had become pregnant during the past year, about three times the pregnancy rate among women with incomes above 400% of the poverty level.

Effects on Unintended Childbearing

Overall, the lower-income women were five-times more likely than the higher-income women to have an unintended birth, according to the report.

Meanwhile, the researchers found that, among women who said they were not actively trying to get pregnant, about one-third said they would not be upset if they became pregnant and that "this proportion [did] not vary by income." According to Vox, this finding suggests that greater barriers to abortion care and reliable contraception, rather than greater indifference about having a child, are behind the higher rate of unintended childbearing among lower-income women (Vox, 2/27).

The researchers wrote, "If all single women adopted the same rates of contraception use as high-income single women, the ratio of unintended births between affluent and poor women would be cut in half" (Lane, New Orleans Times-Picayune, 3/2).


Ark. House Committee Advances One Antiabortion-Rights Bill; Another Stalls

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 15:30

An Arkansas House committee on Tuesday approved a bill (HB 1394) that would restrict medication abortion, while a second measure (HB 1421) that would require abortion providers to have hospital admitting privileges did not advance, the AP/Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports.

Ark. House Committee Advances One Antiabortion-Rights Bill; Another Stalls

March 5, 2015 — An Arkansas House committee on Tuesday approved a bill (HB 1394) that would restrict medication abortion, while a second measure (HB 1421) that would require abortion providers to have hospital admitting privileges did not advance, the AP/Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports.

Medication Abortion Restrictions Bill

The medication abortion bill would require that the drugs be prescribed in accordance with guidelines and dosage limits set by FDA (AP/Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, 3/3). The FDA protocol goes against common medical practice (Women's Health Policy Report, 2/6).

Under the bill, only physicians could provide medication abortion drugs to patients. In addition, the bill would require such physicians to have a contract with another physician who has agreed to handle any complications. The second physician would have to hold admitting and gynecological/surgical privileges at a nearby hospital that can handle such cases.

Providers found in violation of the requirements could be charged with a Class A misdemeanor and face civil penalties and disciplinary action.

The bill now heads to the full state House for consideration (Lyon, Arkansas News, 3/3).

Admitting Privileges Bill

Meanwhile, the committee failed to approve a separate measure that would have required abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the facility where they provide abortion services.

While most of the committee members supported the bill, it did not receive the 11 votes needed to pass out of the committee (AP/Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, 3/3). State Rep. Mary Bentley (R), who sponsored the legislation, said she would try again to advance the bill because some committee members were absent during the vote (Arkansas News, 3/3).


Ohio House Opens Debate on Twice-Rejected 'Heartbeat' Bill

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 15:30

The Ohio House on Tuesday began discussing a bill (HB 69) that would ban abortion if a fetal heartbeat is detectable, which can be as early as six weeks into pregnancy, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports.

Ohio House Opens Debate on Twice-Rejected 'Heartbeat' Bill

March 5, 2015 — The Ohio House on Tuesday began discussing a bill (HB 69) that would ban abortion if a fetal heartbeat is detectable, which can be as early as six weeks into pregnancy, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports.

Similar bills failed in two previous legislative sessions. Some antiabortion-rights lawmakers oppose the legislation because of concerns that it would lead to lengthy legal battles and be declared unconstitutional (Borchardt, Cleveland Plain Dealer, 3/3).

Bill Details

State Reps. Christina Hagan (R) and Ron Hood (R) proposed this year's bill, which would make it a fifth-degree felony for a provider to perform an abortion if a fetal heartbeat can be detected. It includes exemptions if an abortion is needed to save a woman's life or prevent serious health complications. Individuals who violate the ban could face up to a year in prison and fines of up to $2,500.

Further, the measure would create a legislative committee to encourage adoption (Women's Health Policy Report, 2/19).

Comments

The Plain Dealer reports that action at Tuesday's hearing suggests the measure "will be heavily debated" in the state House.

Hagan said the bill aims to challenge the standard set in Roe v. Wade (Cleveland Plain Dealer, 3/3). Under Roe, states cannot ban abortion before the fetus is viable outside the womb, typically around 24 weeks (Women's Health Policy Report, 2/19).

State Rep. Kevin Boyce (D) said the bill fails to acknowledge unique circumstances in individual pregnancies and does not protect rape and incest survivors. He also suggested that the ban could lead women to seek illicit abortions or travel out of state. "What will prevent someone from taking abortion into their own hands?" he asked (Cleveland Plain Dealer, 3/3).


Advocates Want Antiabortion-Rights 'Gag' Provision Dropped From N.D. Human Trafficking Bill

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 17:46

Women's health advocates in North Dakota are calling for the removal of an amendment that would bar state funds from being used to "refer for or counsel" human trafficking survivors "in favor of abortion," the Grand Forks Herald reports.

Advocates Want Antiabortion-Rights 'Gag' Provision Dropped From N.D. Human Trafficking Bill

March 4, 2015 — Women's health advocates in North Dakota are calling for the removal of an amendment that would bar state funds from being used to "refer for or counsel" human trafficking survivors "in favor of abortion," the Grand Forks Herald reports.

The underlying bill (SB 2107), which aims to curb human trafficking, received unanimous approval in the state Senate and now heads to the state House Judiciary Committee for consideration. State Sen. David Hogue (R) proposed the so-called "gag" provision on abortion at the request of the North Dakota Catholic Conference.

Debate

Opponents of the amendment have argued that human trafficking survivors who become pregnant should have access to abortion. "Victims of sexual trafficking are victims of rape," said Karla Rose Hanson of the North Dakota Women's Network, citing a news report that women and girls forced into prostitution can be subjected to hundreds of sexual acts per year.

Amy Jacobson, Planned Parenthood Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota's public affairs manager, expressed concern that the amendment could bar "[a]nybody who gets state dollars ... from telling" pregnant women that abortion is an option.

Supporters of the amendment have said it is consistent with other North Dakota statutes that prohibit state funds from being used for abortion services or counseling. State Sen. Judy Lee (R) added that the language is not likely to be dropped in the state House, but "[t]hat doesn't mean [opponents] shouldn't bring it up" (Springer, Grand Forks Herald, 3/2).


Ohio Abortion Restrictions Strain Providers, Limit Access for Patients

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 17:45

Measures that restrict abortion in Ohio have made it harder for women in the state to access the procedure, NPR's "Shots" reports.

Ohio Abortion Restrictions Strain Providers, Limit Access for Patients

March 4, 2015 — Measures that restrict abortion in Ohio have made it harder for women in the state to access the procedure, NPR's "Shots" reports.

State Abortion Restrictions

Several antiabortion-rights laws have passed in the state since 2011. In that time, the number of clinics has dropped from 16 to eight. According to "Shots," some of the closings are connected to the laws, while one was related to safety violations and another was for business reasons.

One of the state's antiabortion-rights measures requires women to consult with a physician in person and then wait 24 hours before undergoing the procedure. As a result, women must either stay overnight near the clinic or make two trips, "Shots" reports (Ludden, "Shots," NPR, 3/3).

Another Ohio law (HB 78) bans abortions at 24 weeks and requires physicians to perform tests to determine if a fetus is viable beginning at 20 weeks. The law states that a physician cannot perform an abortion between 20 weeks and 24 weeks unless a woman's life is at risk or the physician has determined that the fetus cannot survives outside the womb (Women's Health Policy Report, 1/28).

In addition, provisions in the state budget require abortion clinics to secure a transfer agreement with a private hospital and prohibit them from making such arrangements with public hospitals (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/1/13). According to "Shots," many private hospitals are hesitant to grant such agreements to abortion providers because they are Catholic-affiliated or for other reasons.

Restrictions Strain Providers, Limit Abortion Access

Kellie Copeland, executive director for NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio, said that the clinic restrictions are wearing on providers. Specifically, she noted that the 20-week testing requirement has driven some clinics to stop offering abortions after that time frame, while the transfer agreement rules have placed clinics "in this Catch-22 that really doesn't have anything to do with patient care."

Separately, Chrisse France, executive director of Preterm, an abortion clinic in Cleveland, said the caseload at her clinic has increased by 10% since the restrictions began. "We are more fully booked," she said.

France also noted the clinic is seeing women who travel from farther away, as clinics in locations closer to them have closed, "Shots" reports. She added that finding child care "and transportation are often big issues" for patients trying to comply with the 24-hour mandatory delay requirement.

Further, some women are leaving the state to obtain abortion care, as Ohio restricts the use of medication abortion, "Shots" reports. According to "Shots," roughly one-fourth of women who chose to have an abortion opt for a medication abortion.

Copeland noted that abortion restrictions will not stop women from seeking to end their pregnancies. "At no time in history, nowhere around the globe did outlawing abortion mean women stopped having them," she said, adding, "What it meant is [abortions] became dangerous."

Antiabortion-Rights Efforts Continue

Meanwhile, antiabortion-rights advocates have begun discussing several new abortion restrictions, including a stricter 20-week ban, a measure that would ban abortion in the case of a Down syndrome diagnosis and a fetal "heartbeat" bill (HB 69) that could ban the procedure as early as six weeks into pregnancy, "Shots" reports.

Ohio Right to Life President Mike Gonidakis said, "Our goal ultimately is to live in a society where abortion is no longer even considered" ("Shots," NPR, 3/3).


Wis. Gov. Walker Says He Would Support 20-Week Abortion Ban

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 17:44

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) in an open letter on Tuesday said he would sign a measure banning abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, if such a bill reaches his desk, the New York Times' "First Draft" reports.

Wis. Gov. Walker Says He Would Support 20-Week Abortion Ban

March 4, 2015 — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) in an open letter on Tuesday said he would sign a measure banning abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, if such a bill reaches his desk, the New York Times' "First Draft" reports (Gabriel, "First Draft," New York Times, 3/3).

The letter was released by the antiabortion-rights group Susan B. Anthony List, on letterhead from Walker's campaign (Marley, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 3/3).

Walker wrote in the letter, "As the Wisconsin Legislature moves forward in the coming session, further protections for mother and child are likely to come to my desk in the form of a bill to prohibit abortions after 20 weeks. I will sign that bill when it gets to my desk and support similar legislation on the federal level."

According to "First Draft," Walker declined to say during his 2014 re-election campaign whether he would support such a measure. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel asked him about the issue four times in an interview during the race ("First Draft," New York Times, 3/3).

Walker in the letter also highlighted actions in support of his antiabortion-rights stance, including blocking funding to Planned Parenthood and signing legislation (SB 206) requiring abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. The admitting privileges requirement is currently on hold pending the results of federal litigation.

Reaction

Julaine Appling -- president of Wisconsin Family Action, which supports 20-week abortion bans -- applauded Walker's move to take a stance on the issue. She said it shows that Walker "understands that this kind of bill is helpful in advancing the pro-life position."

Meanwhile, Nicole Safar, public policy director at Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said Walker's announcement was politically motivated.

Similarly, state Senate Minority Leader Jennifer Shilling (D) said the governor "is showing his true colors as he continues to woo the voters of Iowa" (AP/Chicago Tribune, 3/3).

According to Politico, Walker joins most of the other expected contenders for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination by supporting a ban on abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy.

SBA List President Marjorie Dannenfelser said the exception is New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R), who has not announced a position on 20-week bans. She encouraged him to also take a stance in support of such legislation (Hohmann, Politico, 3/3).


W.Va. House Votes To Override Veto of 20-Week Abortion Ban

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 17:43

The West Virginia House on Wednesday morning voted 77-16 to override a veto of a bill (HB 2568) that would ban abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, the West Virginia State Journal reports. The bill now heads to the state Senate for an override attempt.

W.Va. House Votes To Override Veto of 20-Week Abortion Ban

March 4, 2015 — The West Virginia House on Wednesday morning voted 77-16 to override a veto of a bill (HB 2568) that would ban abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, the West Virginia State Journal reports. The bill now heads to the state Senate for an override attempt (Cardosi, West Virginia State Journal, 3/4).

West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin (D) vetoed the bill on Tuesday, marking the second year in a row that he has rejected such legislation (Kabler, Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

Bill Details and Background

Tomblin said in a statement that he vetoed the measure on the grounds that it is unconstitutional. The Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade said that states cannot ban abortion before fetal viability, which is considered around 24 weeks of pregnancy (Bassett, Huffington Post, 3/3).

"At the start of the regular session, I urged members of the Legislature to consider a compromise that would help us establish legislation that would pass constitutional muster," Tomblin said in the veto message, adding, "Having received a substantially similar bill to the one vetoed last year on constitutional grounds, I must veto House Bill 2568" (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

The bill is based on the premise that fetuses can feel pain at 20 weeks gestation. However, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has said that there is no legitimate scientific evidence showing that fetuses are capable of feeling pain at 20 weeks.

The bill would allow exceptions to the ban for medical emergencies but not for instances when the woman faces severe psychological distress. Physicians who violate the measure would not face any criminal penalties, but they could have their medical licenses suspended or revoked (Women's Health Policy Report, 2/26).

Veto Override Effort

According to the State Journal, the state Legislature has two days after a veto to attempt to override it (West Virginia State Journal, 3/4).

An override requires a simple majority vote in both chambers. The bill passed the state House 87-21 and the state Senate 29-5 earlier this year (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

Comments

State House Speaker Tim Armstead (R) said he was "disappointed" that Tomblin vetoed the bill. Armstead added that he "believe[s] the legislation is constitutionally sound and represents the right public policy in our state" (West Virginia State Journal, 3/4).

However, WV Free Executive Director Margaret Chapman Pomponio said the governor made the right decision. She noted that veto override could set the stage for a costly legal battle over the legislation, adding, "The idea of dragging taxpayers through an unconstitutional fight is unthinkable" (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

Planned Parenthood South Atlantic Vice President Melissa Reed said, "The reality is that abortion later in pregnancy is very rare and often happens in complex circumstances where a wanted pregnancy has gone tragically wrong," adding, "These are the kind of situations where a woman and her doctor need every medical option available" (Huffington Post, 3/3).

Meanwhile, West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey (R) said in a statement Tuesday that he would defend the measure if it is challenged in court. "It is long-past time that limits are placed on abortions in West Virginia," he said, adding, "While no one can predict with certainty how a court will rule, I believe that there are strong, good-faith arguments that this legislation is constitutional and should be upheld by the courts" (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).


W.Va. House Votes To Override Veto of 20-Week Abortion Ban

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 17:01

The West Virginia House on Wednesday morning voted 77-16 to override a veto of a bill (HB 2568) that would ban abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, the West Virginia State Journal reports. The bill now heads to the state Senate for an override attempt.

W.Va. House Votes To Override Veto of 20-Week Abortion Ban

March 4, 2015 — The West Virginia House on Wednesday morning voted 77-16 to override a veto of a bill (HB 2568) that would ban abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, the West Virginia State Journal reports. The bill now heads to the state Senate for an override attempt (Cardosi, West Virginia State Journal, 3/4).

West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin (D) vetoed the bill on Tuesday, marking the second year in a row that he has rejected such legislation (Kabler, Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

Bill Details and Background

Tomblin said in a statement that he vetoed the measure on the grounds that it is unconstitutional. The Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade said that states cannot ban abortion before fetal viability, which is considered around 24 weeks of pregnancy (Bassett, Huffington Post, 3/3).

"At the start of the regular session, I urged members of the Legislature to consider a compromise that would help us establish legislation that would pass constitutional muster," Tomblin said in the veto message, adding, "Having received a substantially similar bill to the one vetoed last year on constitutional grounds, I must veto House Bill 2568" (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

The bill is based on the premise that fetuses can feel pain at 20 weeks gestation. However, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has said that there is no legitimate scientific evidence showing that fetuses are capable of feeling pain at 20 weeks.

The bill would allow exceptions to the ban for medical emergencies but not for instances when the woman faces severe psychological distress. Physicians who violate the measure would not face any criminal penalties, but they could have their medical licenses suspended or revoked (Women's Health Policy Report, 2/26).

Veto Override Effort

According to the State Journal, the state Legislature has two days after a veto to attempt to override it (West Virginia State Journal, 3/4).

An override requires a simple majority vote in both chambers. The bill passed the state House 87-21 and the state Senate 29-5 earlier this year (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

Comments

State House Speaker Tim Armstead (R) said he was "disappointed" that Tomblin vetoed the bill. Armstead added that he "believe[s] the legislation is constitutionally sound and represents the right public policy in our state" (West Virginia State Journal, 3/4).

However, WV Free Executive Director Margaret Chapman Pomponio said the governor made the right decision. She noted that veto override could set the stage for a costly legal battle over the legislation, adding, "The idea of dragging taxpayers through an unconstitutional fight is unthinkable" (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).

Planned Parenthood South Atlantic Vice President Melissa Reed said, "The reality is that abortion later in pregnancy is very rare and often happens in complex circumstances where a wanted pregnancy has gone tragically wrong," adding, "These are the kind of situations where a woman and her doctor need every medical option available" (Huffington Post, 3/3).

Meanwhile, West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey (R) said in a statement Tuesday that he would defend the measure if it is challenged in court. "It is long-past time that limits are placed on abortions in West Virginia," he said, adding, "While no one can predict with certainty how a court will rule, I believe that there are strong, good-faith arguments that this legislation is constitutional and should be upheld by the courts" (Charleston Gazette, 3/3).


Ohio Abortion Restrictions Strain Providers, Limit Access for Patients

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 16:18

Measures that restrict abortion in Ohio have made it harder for women in the state to access the procedure, NPR's "Shots" reports.

Ohio Abortion Restrictions Strain Providers, Limit Access for Patients

March 4, 2015 — Measures that restrict abortion in Ohio have made it harder for women in the state to access the procedure, NPR's "Shots" reports.

State Abortion Restrictions

Several antiabortion-rights laws have passed in the state since 2011. In that time, the number of clinics has dropped from 16 to eight. According to "Shots," some of the closings are connected to the laws, while one was related to safety violations and another was for business reasons.

One of the state's antiabortion-rights measures requires women to consult with a physician in person and then wait 24 hours before undergoing the procedure. As a result, women must either stay overnight near the clinic or make two trips, "Shots" reports (Ludden, "Shots," NPR, 3/3).

Another Ohio law (HB 78) bans abortions at 24 weeks and requires physicians to perform tests to determine if a fetus is viable beginning at 20 weeks. The law states that a physician cannot perform an abortion between 20 weeks and 24 weeks unless a woman's life is at risk or the physician has determined that the fetus cannot survives outside the womb (Women's Health Policy Report, 1/28).

In addition, provisions in the state budget require abortion clinics to secure a transfer agreement with a private hospital and prohibit them from making such arrangements with public hospitals (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/1/13). According to "Shots," many private hospitals are hesitant to grant such agreements to abortion providers because they are Catholic-affiliated or for other reasons.

Restrictions Strain Providers, Limit Abortion Access

Kellie Copeland, executive director for NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio, said that the clinic restrictions are wearing on providers. Specifically, she noted that the 20-week testing requirement has driven some clinics to stop offering abortions after that time frame, while the transfer agreement rules have placed clinics "in this Catch-22 that really doesn't have anything to do with patient care."

Separately, Chrisse France, executive director of Preterm, an abortion clinic in Cleveland, said the caseload at her clinic has increased by 10% since the restrictions began. "We are more fully booked," she said.

France also noted the clinic is seeing women who travel from farther away, as clinics in locations closer to them have closed, "Shots" reports. She added that finding child care "and transportation are often big issues" for patients trying to comply with the 24-hour mandatory delay requirement.

Further, some women are leaving the state to obtain abortion care, as Ohio restricts the use of medication abortion, "Shots" reports. According to "Shots," roughly one-fourth of women who chose to have an abortion opt for a medication abortion.

Copeland noted that abortion restrictions will not stop women from seeking to end their pregnancies. "At no time in history, nowhere around the globe did outlawing abortion mean women stopped having them," she said, adding, "What it meant is [abortions] became dangerous."

Antiabortion-Rights Efforts Continue

Meanwhile, antiabortion-rights advocates have begun discussing several new abortion restrictions, including a stricter 20-week ban, a measure that would ban abortion in the case of a Down syndrome diagnosis and a fetal "heartbeat" bill (HB 69) that could ban the procedure as early as six weeks into pregnancy, "Shots" reports.

Ohio Right to Life President Mike Gonidakis said, "Our goal ultimately is to live in a society where abortion is no longer even considered" ("Shots," NPR, 3/3).


Wis. Gov. Walker Says He Would Support 20-Week Abortion Ban

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 16:07

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) in an open letter on Tuesday said he would sign a measure banning abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, if such a bill reaches his desk, the New York Times' "First Draft" reports.

Wis. Gov. Walker Says He Would Support 20-Week Abortion Ban

March 4, 2015 — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) in an open letter on Tuesday said he would sign a measure banning abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy, if such a bill reaches his desk, the New York Times' "First Draft" reports (Gabriel, "First Draft," New York Times, 3/3).

The letter was released by the antiabortion-rights group Susan B. Anthony List, on letterhead from Walker's campaign (Marley, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 3/3).

Walker wrote in the letter, "As the Wisconsin Legislature moves forward in the coming session, further protections for mother and child are likely to come to my desk in the form of a bill to prohibit abortions after 20 weeks. I will sign that bill when it gets to my desk and support similar legislation on the federal level."

According to "First Draft," Walker declined to say during his 2014 re-election campaign whether he would support such a measure. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel asked him about the issue four times in an interview during the race ("First Draft," New York Times, 3/3).

Walker in the letter also highlighted actions in support of his antiabortion-rights stance, including blocking funding to Planned Parenthood and signing legislation (SB 206) requiring abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. The admitting privileges requirement is currently on hold pending the results of federal litigation.

Reaction

Julaine Appling -- president of Wisconsin Family Action, which supports 20-week abortion bans -- applauded Walker's move to take a stance on the issue. She said it shows that Walker "understands that this kind of bill is helpful in advancing the pro-life position."

Meanwhile, Nicole Safar, public policy director at Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said Walker's announcement was politically motivated.

Similarly, state Senate Minority Leader Jennifer Shilling (D) said the governor "is showing his true colors as he continues to woo the voters of Iowa" (AP/Chicago Tribune, 3/3).

According to Politico, Walker joins most of the other expected contenders for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination by supporting a ban on abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy.

SBA List President Marjorie Dannenfelser said the exception is New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R), who has not announced a position on 20-week bans. She encouraged him to also take a stance in support of such legislation (Hohmann, Politico, 3/3).


Advocates Want Antiabortion-Rights 'Gag' Provision Dropped From N.D. Human Trafficking Bill

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 15:49

Women's health advocates in North Dakota are calling for the removal of an amendment that would bar state funds from being used to "refer for or counsel" human trafficking survivors "in favor of abortion," the Grand Forks Herald reports.

Advocates Want Antiabortion-Rights 'Gag' Provision Dropped From N.D. Human Trafficking Bill

March 4, 2015 — Women's health advocates in North Dakota are calling for the removal of an amendment that would bar state funds from being used to "refer for or counsel" human trafficking survivors "in favor of abortion," the Grand Forks Herald reports.

The underlying bill (SB 2107), which aims to curb human trafficking, received unanimous approval in the state Senate and now heads to the state House Judiciary Committee for consideration. State Sen. David Hogue (R) proposed the so-called "gag" provision on abortion at the request of the North Dakota Catholic Conference.

Debate

Opponents of the amendment have argued that human trafficking survivors who become pregnant should have access to abortion. "Victims of sexual trafficking are victims of rape," said Karla Rose Hanson of the North Dakota Women's Network, citing a news report that women and girls forced into prostitution can be subjected to hundreds of sexual acts per year.

Amy Jacobson, Planned Parenthood Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota's public affairs manager, expressed concern that the amendment could bar "[a]nybody who gets state dollars ... from telling" pregnant women that abortion is an option.

Supporters of the amendment have said it is consistent with other North Dakota statutes that prohibit state funds from being used for abortion services or counseling. State Sen. Judy Lee (R) added that the language is not likely to be dropped in the state House, but "[t]hat doesn't mean [opponents] shouldn't bring it up" (Springer, Grand Forks Herald, 3/2).


Stuart v. Loomis

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 07:50

Federal court challenge to a North Carolina law that prohibits a woman from getting an abortion until four hours after her physician performs an ultrasound, places the ultrasound images in her view, and provides her with a detailed explanation and description of the images, whether or not she wants to see the images or hear any or all of the description.

Stuart v. Loomis

Federal court challenge to a North Carolina law that prohibits a woman from getting an abortion until four hours after her physician performs an ultrasound, places the ultrasound images in her view, and provides her with a detailed explanation and description of the images, whether or not she wants to see the images or hear any or all of the description. In December 2011, the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina judge granted a preliminary injunction against enforcement of parts of the law. Current Status: In January 2014, the district court declared the speech-and-display provision unconstitutional and issued a permanent injunction, preventing enforcement. The state appealed the injunction to the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals. (See the law here. See the district court opinion supporting the temporary injunction here. See the district court opinion supporting the permanent injunction here. Read more about the case here.)

NAACP v. Horne

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 06:45

Federal court challenge to a 2011 Arizona law that requires providers to certify that a patient's reasons for seeking abortion care are unrelated to the race or sex of the fetus.

NAACP v. Horne

Federal court challenge to a 2011 Arizona law that requires providers to certify that a patient’s reasons for seeking abortion care are unrelated to the race or sex of the fetus. In May 2013, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a complaint in U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona. The case was dismissed for lack of standing. Current Status: On March 12, 2014, The National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF) and the NAACP appealed the dismissal. (See the law here. See the complaint here. See the final decision here. Read more about the case here.)