Daily Women's Health Policy Report

  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
Syndicate content
Daily Women's Health Policy Report by the National Partnership for Women & Families
Updated: 1 hour 40 min ago

Physicians Group Backs LGBT-Inclusive Health Policies

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 13:47

The American College of Physicians has expressed support for policies that the group said will improve health among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals, according to a policy paper published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, Reuters reports.

Physicians Group Backs LGBT-Inclusive Health Policies

May 13, 2015 — The American College of Physicians has expressed support for policies that the group said will improve health among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals, according to a policy paper published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, Reuters reports.

According to Reuters, ACP is the largest group representing internal medicine doctors in the U.S.

Announcement Details

In the policy position paper, the organization outlined nine LGBT-inclusive policies that it favors. The policies include support for insurance plans that cover comprehensive transgender health care services, opposition to so-called conversion or reparative therapy and support for same-sex marriage rights, among others.

According to the paper, the LGBT community experiences the same health concerns as the rest of the population, but certain disparities might be greater among LGBT individuals. For example, ACP wrote that women who have sex with women, as well as women who have sex with men and women, are less likely than heterosexual women to be screened for cervical cancer or breast cancer. Meanwhile, men who have sex with men, as well as men who have sex with men and women, represent about 4% of the male population but about two-thirds of new HIV infections in the U.S., according to CDC estimates.

ACP President Wayne Riley said the paper "speaks to the fact that the nation's largest specialty society comes down on the side of health equity for all."

Specifically, he said the support for transgender health coverage helps ensure "transgender individuals can access the appropriate level of healthcare services to provide them with opportunities that ... anybody else has with health and wellness." Conversely, he said that ACP "agree[s] conversation therapy is not a wise use of healthcare resources" (Seaman, Reuters, 5/11).


Featured Blogs

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 11:41

"Tennessee's New Abortion Law Could Leave the State With Just Four Abortion Clinics" (Barbato, Bustle, 5/9); "Oregon Bans 'Conversion Therapy' of LGBTQ Youth" (Liss-Schultz, RH Reality Check, 5/11).

May 12, 2015

FEATURED BLOG

"Tennessee's New Abortion Law Could Leave the State With Just Four Abortion Clinics," Lauren Barbato, Bustle: "Following the path cleared by abortion foes in Texas, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam [R] signed an extreme anti-abortion measure [SB 1280] that could close a handful of the state's clinics by July 1," Barbato writes. She explains that the new law requires "all clinics and physicians' offices that perform more than 50 abortions per year to be licensed as ambulatory surgical treatment centers," meaning that they "will need to meet the same building requirements as hospital-style outpatient surgery centers," including "creating wider hallways and entrances ... and changing the size of the exam rooms." According to Barbato, only "about half of Tennessee's clinics -- just four in all -- meet the requirements of an ambulatory surgical center" and the remaining clinics, including those in more populous areas of the state, will "be forced to close unless they can upgrade their facilities by July 1." Citing figures from the Guttmacher Institute, Barbato notes that 23 states currently mandate similar requirements and that in one of those states, Texas, "the requirement has been successful at not only shutting clinics, but rendering abortion nearly obsolete for women outside metropolitan areas" (Barbato, Bustle, 5/9).

FEATURED BLOG

"Oregon Bans 'Conversion Therapy' of LGBTQ Youth," Nina Liss-Schultz, RH Reality Check: Oregon is set to become "the fourth jurisdiction, following California, New Jersey, and Washington, D.C., to ban so-called conversion therapy for minors" under a bill (HB 2307) passed Friday by the state Senate, Liss-Schultz writes. She notes that conversion therapy, "in which mental health professionals seek to change a person's sexual identity or orientation, relies on both the outdated belief that non-straight sexual orientation is a mental health disorder and the discriminatory belief that same-sex orientation is of less value than heterosexuality." Conversion therapy "has been lambasted by the medical and mental health professional communities, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Psychological Association and the American Psychiatric Association," she adds, noting that bills similar to HB 2307 have been introduced in 17 states. Further, she notes that "[b]oth the California and New Jersey laws have recently held up in court" and that the Obama administration in April "threw its support behind the bans" (Liss-Schultz, RH Reality Check, 5/11).


Op-Ed Examines 'Systematic Failures' of U.S. Reproductive Health Care Behind Feticide Cases

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 11:39

The case of Purvi Patel has spurred "the expected anti-abortion and pro-choice debates," but it also can be used to evaluate women's access to reproductive health in the U.S., columnist Sharmila Rudrappa writes in an American Prospect/Public Voices Fellowship opinion piece.

Op-Ed Examines 'Systematic Failures' of U.S. Reproductive Health Care Behind Feticide Cases

May 12, 2015 — The case of Purvi Patel has spurred "the expected anti-abortion and pro-choice debates," but it also can be used to evaluate women's access to reproductive health in the U.S., columnist Sharmila Rudrappa writes in an American Prospect/Public Voices Fellowship opinion piece.

Rudrappa explains that Patel, "a 33-year old Indian immigrant from South Bend, Indiana, was charged with feticide and child neglect" based on allegations that she "attempted to terminate her second-trimester pregnancy with illegal pharmaceutical abortifacients" and disposed of the fetus before seeking medical care.

Rudrappa notes that while some have argued that Patel could have gotten an abortion during the first trimester of her pregnancy, the procedure "is not easily accessible in Indiana," which as of 2011 had "just 12 providers." Further, in Indiana, "[h]ealth plans ... and public funding cover abortions only if the woman's life is endangered, or she is a victim of rape or incest," Rudrappa writes, adding that women seeking abortion in the state also "must receive state-directed, in-person counseling including an ultrasound," be offered a choice to view the ultrasound and "wait 18 hours before any procedures can be initiated."

Further, Rudrappa questions how Patel's situation might "have been different if she had access to easily available, affordable reproductive care" beyond "simply abortion provision." She continues, "What if women and children had the right to broad sex education including contraception and not just abstinence; deeper understanding about pregnancies; comprehensive, easily accessible and high quality prenatal care; equally excellent and accessible post-natal care; and, emotional support for mother and child?"

Rudrappa cites the U.S.'s comparatively high rates of infant mortality and maternal death, adding, "What does it mean to punish women for ... their individual perceived moral failures, while remaining silent on the systemic failures that result in lack of support for women in their pregnancies, and after childbirth?" (Rudrappa, American Prospect, 5/10).


N.Y. AG Proposes Bill To Codify ACA's Contraceptive Coverage Benefits Into State Law

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 11:38

New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman (D) on Monday proposed a bill that would codify the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) contraceptive coverage rules into state law and add additional birth control benefits and protections, the New York Daily News reports.

N.Y. AG Proposes Bill To Codify ACA's Contraceptive Coverage Benefits Into State Law

May 12, 2015 — New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman (D) on Monday proposed a bill that would codify the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) contraceptive coverage rules into state law and add additional birth control benefits and protections, the New York Daily News reports (Blain, New York Daily News, 5/10).

Background

Federal guidance on the contraceptive coverage rules under the ACA states that insurers must cover the full range of FDA-approved contraceptive methods without cost sharing (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/17). However, some insurers have denied full coverage of some methods or imposed copays, according to recent reports, the Daily News reports (New York Daily News, 5/10).

On Thursday, Schneiderman requested information from 11 insurers in the state regarding their contraceptive coverage. Schneiderman's office has requested that the insurers respond to a list of 10 questions regarding coverage for birth control by May 28.

Bill Details

Schneiderman's bill, called the Comprehensive Contraception Coverage Act of 2015, would allow individuals to receive one year's supply of birth control at one time (Hughes, Albany Times Union, 5/11).

In addition, it would prohibit insurers from denying or limiting birth control coverage by using medical management techniques (New York Daily News, 5/10). The ACA permits insurers to use "reasonable medical management techniques" to curb costs, such as only covering the generic version of an approved contraceptive (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/17).

Further, the bill would require New York insurers to cover men's contraceptive methods, including condoms and vasectomies.

Comments

Schneiderman said, "New Yorkers should not be penalized by their insurance companies for using the birth control method that they and their medical provider agree is most appropriate for them" (Albany Times Union, 5/11).

Meanwhile, Leslie Moran, senior vice president of the New York Health Plan Association, said insurers in the state currently are complying with the ACA's contraceptive coverage rules. She said, "There is a shared goal of the state and the health plans to provide access to coverage, including contraception" (New York Daily News, 5/10).


Report: More Than Half of Texas Women Face Barriers to Reproductive Health Services

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 11:37

More than 50% of Texas women encountered at least one barrier while trying to access reproductive health services in the years following the state's overhaul of its family planning services program, according to a recent report from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project, the Kaiser Health News/Texas Tribune reports.

Report: More Than Half of Texas Women Face Barriers to Reproductive Health Services

May 12, 2015 — More than 50% of Texas women encountered at least one barrier while trying to access reproductive health services in the years following the state's overhaul of its family planning services program, according to a recent report from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project, the Kaiser Health News/Texas Tribune reports (Ura, Kaiser Health News/Texas Tribune, 5/12).

Background

In 2011, the Texas Legislature cut the state's family planning budget by two-thirds and blocked funding to Planned Parenthood and other women's health clinics affiliated with abortion providers. As a result of the cuts, 76 of Texas' family planning clinics closed or stopped providing family planning services, according to a survey by University of Texas-Austin researchers.

To mitigate the effect of the 2011 cuts, Texas legislators during the 2013 session increased women's health funds to $214 million for the 2014-2015 state budget, up from $109 million in the previous budget. The funding was dedicated to expanding primary care, operating the Texas Women's Health Program and replacing the family planning grants that the federal government awarded to another organization to distribute (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/21/14).

Report Details

For the report, researchers from TxPEP reviewed women's access to reproductive health services -- including cervical cancer screenings, contraceptives and family planning -- beginning in 2011, the year the cuts took place. Researchers surveyed 779 Texas women between the ages of 18 and 49.

The report found that 55% of the respondents encountered barriers to access. Specifically, 18% of respondents experienced one barrier to access and 37% experienced at least two barriers to access.

The report also identified the types of barriers women encountered between 2011 and 2014. Specifically, 38% of women said they faced financial difficulties accessing such care, 23% said they could not take time away from school or work, 20% reported insurance issues and 15% said there were no nearby services. Other barriers included discomfort with health care providers, a lack of childcare, no transportation options, language barriers or a lack of support from partners or family.

Overall, the report found that young women with low incomes and low education levels, especially Hispanic women who spoke Spanish and were born in Mexico, experienced the most barriers to accessing reproductive health services (Kaiser Health News/Texas Tribune, 5/12).

Abortion-Rights Groups Grow in Texas Amid Increased Abortion Restrictions

In related news, a growing coalition of volunteer-led abortion-rights groups in Texas are working to protect abortion access in the state amid increasing restrictions on the procedure, the Texas Observer reports.

For example, one group called Fund Texas Choice uses up to $5,000 monthly to help women seeking abortion care pay for their travel and accommodations costs, with individual trips ranging between $35 to $1,000. According to the Observer, the group between November 2013 and March 2015 helped to plan and pay for 158 trips for women to receive abortions.

Occasionally, Fund Texas Choice will put women in touch with another group, called the Lilith Fund, which runs a hotline women can call for help funding the abortion procedure. The Lilith Fund gives women in Central and South Texas small stipends for the procedure, while other groups -- the Texas Equal Access Fund and the West Fund -- do the same for women in North Texas and El Paso, respectively.

Meanwhile, according to the Observer, still other volunteer-led organizations help women by providing a ride to an abortion clinic in certain areas of the state. For example, Clinic Access Support Network helps provide rides for women in Houston, while the Bridge Collective provides this assistance to women in Austin and the Cicada Collective works for women in North Texas.

Lenzi Sheible, founder of Fund Texas Choice, said of the network of groups, "We fight on our own terms. Giving up is not an option ... Texans are not just going to sit here and let this happen to us" (Garcia-Ditta, Texas Observer, 5/11).


Obama Admin Clarifies ACA Birth Control Rules, Other Preventive Services Requirements

Tue, 05/12/2015 - 16:48

The Obama administration on Monday issued new guidance clarifying several aspects of the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) requirement that plans provide a range of preventive services at no cost, the New York Times reports.

Obama Admin Clarifies ACA Birth Control Rules, Other Preventive Services Requirements

May 12, 2015 — The Obama administration on Monday issued new guidance clarifying several aspects of the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) requirement that plans provide a range of preventive services at no cost, the New York Times reports.

The guidance was jointly released by HHS and the departments of Labor and Treasury (Pear, New York Times, 5/11). It will go into effect in 60 days, although most consumers will not experience major changes until their next plan year, according to AP/U-T San Diego (Alonso-Zaldivar, AP/U-T San Diego, 5/11).

Background

The ACA's preventive services provision, which took effect in 2012, requires insurers to cover a range of services without copayments or deductibles.

Federal guidance on the contraceptive coverage rules under the ACA states that insurers must cover the full range of FDA-approved contraceptive methods without cost-sharing. Insurers are permitted to use "reasonable medical management techniques" to curb costs, such as only covering the generic version of an approved contraceptive (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/30).

However, some insurers have not been adhering to the ACA's preventive services requirements, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation report and two separate National Women's Law Center studies, all released last month. KFF and NWLC both found that some plans were not covering all FDA-approved contraceptives without copayments (New York Times, 5/11). Meanwhile, the NWLC report also found that some insurers were not covering care for transgender individuals (Owens, National Journal, 5/11).

Guidance Details on Birth Control

The new guidance states that insurers must cover at least one version of each of the 18 FDA-approved birth control methods without cost-sharing (AP/U-T San Diego, 5/11). However, the guidance also states that insurers are permitted to charge a copayment or deductible to encourage beneficiaries to use a particular brand or generic version of a given contraceptive method (Galewitz, Kaiser Health News, 5/11).

NWLC had found that some insurers said they did not provide coverage for the ring or the patch because they already covered oral contraceptives, which deliver the same hormones (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/30). However, the new guidance clarifies that insurers "may not impose cost-sharing on the ring or the patch" (New York Times, 5/11).

Additional Guidance Details

In addition, the guidance states that insurers are required to cover, without cost-sharing, maternity care and all other women's health services for dependents also covered by a plan (Radnofsky, Wall Street Journal, 5/11). It notes that insurers must cover without copayments or deductibles prenatal benefits and other services intended to assist with healthy pregnancies for plans that have children covered as dependents (AP/U-T San Diego, 5/11).

Further, the guidance clarifies that insurers are required to cover "preventive screening, genetic counseling, and genetic testing" for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations "without cost-sharing, if appropriate, for a woman as determined by her attending provider." The requirement applies "[a]s long as the woman has not been diagnosed with BRCA-related cancer."

The genetic tests -- which the guidance states could be appropriate for women with family histories of breast, ovarian, peritoneal or tubal cancer-- can help women determine whether to have pre-emptive surgery to reduce their cancer risk (Berkrot, Reuters, 5/11).

Meanwhile, the guidance also clarifies that insurers cannot limit "sex-specific recommended preventive services" based on the sex an individual was assigned at birth or an individual's gender identity (New York Times, 5/11). For example, insurers cannot refuse to cover a mammogram for a transgender woman over age 50, even if the woman's insurance records lists her as a man (National Journal, 5/11).

Comments

Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) said the new guidance would help make sure that "women receive 'the health care they are entitled to" under the ACA, including birth control.

Gretchen Borchelt, NWLC's vice president for health and reproductive rights, commended the guidance, saying, "It is now absolutely clear that all means all -- all unique birth control methods for women must be covered" (New York Times, 5/11).

Meanwhile, America's Health Insurance Plans CEO Karen Ignagni said the "guidance takes important steps to support health plans' use of medical management in providing women with safe, affordable healthcare services" (Herman, Modern Healthcare, 5/11).

Op-Ed Urged Obama Administration To Ensure Contraceptive Coverage Under the ACA

Just before the administration issued the new guidance, Deborah Nucatola, senior director of medical services at Planned Parenthood Federation of America, and Hal Lawrence, executive vice president and CEO of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, explained why "[o]ffering women the full range of FDA-approved birth control methods is an essential part of health care" in a Roll Call opinion piece urging such guidance.

For example, the authors note that "[s]ome insurers restrict access to certain birth control methods ... by forcing women to undergo 'step therapy,'" under which a woman "may be forced to use one birth control method, such as the pill, regardless of whether it works for her, before getting coverage for the ring, patch, [intrauterine device] or other method she and her doctor have decided is best for her." Meanwhile, "[s]ome insurers ... requir[e] prior authorization, an extra step that gives the insurer the right to reject a doctor's prescription," Nucatola and Lawrence write.

The authors explain that as medical professionals, they "see firsthand there is no one-size-fits-all method of birth control." For example, they note that some women cannot use certain methods because of "medical conditions," some "suffer from side effects when they use certain contraceptives" and "conversely, some may seek out hormonal methods to regulate conditions such as endometriosis." Further, they point out that "[s]ome women have lifestyles that just don't allow for birth control that depends on daily doses for effectiveness."

In addition, Nucatola and Lawrence write that "[m]any forms of birth control are prohibitively expensive for many women if they must foot the bill out of pocket." They note that "more than half of all American female voters ages 18 to 34 have struggled with the cost of birth control at some point, and as a result have used birth control inconsistently." However, the authors add that "[t]hanks to the birth control benefit, women and families saved more than $483 million in out-of-pocket costs for the birth control pill -- an average of $269 per woman -- in the first year alone" and "prevented unintended pregnancies" (Nucatola/Lawrence, Roll Call, 5/8).


Report: More Than Half of Texas Women Face Barriers to Reproductive Health Services

Tue, 05/12/2015 - 15:49

More than 50% of Texas women encountered at least one barrier while trying to access reproductive health services in the years following the state's overhaul of its family planning services program, according to a recent report from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project, the Kaiser Health News/Texas Tribune reports.

Report: More Than Half of Texas Women Face Barriers to Reproductive Health Services

May 12, 2015 — More than 50% of Texas women encountered at least one barrier while trying to access reproductive health services in the years following the state's overhaul of its family planning services program, according to a recent report from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project, the Kaiser Health News/Texas Tribune reports (Ura, Kaiser Health News/Texas Tribune, 5/12).

Background

In 2011, the Texas Legislature cut the state's family planning budget by two-thirds and blocked funding to Planned Parenthood and other women's health clinics affiliated with abortion providers. As a result of the cuts, 76 of Texas' family planning clinics closed or stopped providing family planning services, according to a survey by University of Texas-Austin researchers.

To mitigate the effect of the 2011 cuts, Texas legislators during the 2013 session increased women's health funds to $214 million for the 2014-2015 state budget, up from $109 million in the previous budget. The funding was dedicated to expanding primary care, operating the Texas Women's Health Program and replacing the family planning grants that the federal government awarded to another organization to distribute (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/21/14).

Report Details

For the report, researchers from TxPEP reviewed women's access to reproductive health services -- including cervical cancer screenings, contraceptives and family planning -- beginning in 2011, the year the cuts took place. Researchers surveyed 779 Texas women between the ages of 18 and 49.

The report found that 55% of the respondents encountered barriers to access. Specifically, 18% of respondents experienced one barrier to access and 37% experienced at least two barriers to access.

The report also identified the types of barriers women encountered between 2011 and 2014. Specifically, 38% of women said they faced financial difficulties accessing such care, 23% said they could not take time away from school or work, 20% reported insurance issues and 15% said there were no nearby services. Other barriers included discomfort with health care providers, a lack of childcare, no transportation options, language barriers or a lack of support from partners or family.

Overall, the report found that young women with low incomes and low education levels, especially Hispanic women who spoke Spanish and were born in Mexico, experienced the most barriers to accessing reproductive health services (Kaiser Health News/Texas Tribune, 5/12).

Abortion-Rights Groups Grow in Texas Amid Increased Abortion Restrictions

In related news, a growing coalition of volunteer-led abortion-rights groups in Texas are working to protect abortion access in the state amid increasing restrictions on the procedure, the Texas Observer reports.

For example, one group called Fund Texas Choice uses up to $5,000 monthly to help women seeking abortion care pay for their travel and accommodations costs, with individual trips ranging between $35 to $1,000. According to the Observer, the group between November 2013 and March 2015 helped to plan and pay for 158 trips for women to receive abortions.

Occasionally, Fund Texas Choice will put women in touch with another group, called the Lilith Fund, which runs a hotline women can call for help funding the abortion procedure. The Lilith Fund gives women in Central and South Texas small stipends for the procedure, while other groups -- the Texas Equal Access Fund and the West Fund -- do the same for women in North Texas and El Paso, respectively.

Meanwhile, according to the Observer, still other volunteer-led organizations help women by providing a ride to an abortion clinic in certain areas of the state. For example, Clinic Access Support Network helps provide rides for women in Houston, while the Bridge Collective provides this assistance to women in Austin and the Cicada Collective works for women in North Texas.

Lenzi Sheible, founder of Fund Texas Choice, said of the network of groups, "We fight on our own terms. Giving up is not an option ... Texans are not just going to sit here and let this happen to us" (Garcia-Ditta, Texas Observer, 5/11).


Blogs Comment on Threat to Tennessee Clinics, Spread of Catholic Hospital Restrictions on Care, More

Tue, 05/12/2015 - 15:29

Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at Bustle, Salon and more.

Blogs Comment on Threat to Tennessee Clinics, Spread of Catholic Hospital Restrictions on Care, More

May 12, 2015 — Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at Bustle, Salon and more.

ABORTION RESTRICTIONS: "Tennessee's New Abortion Law Could Leave the State With Just Four Abortion Clinics," Lauren Barbato, Bustle: "Following the path cleared by abortion foes in Texas, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam [R] signed an extreme anti-abortion measure [SB 1280] that could close a handful of the state's clinics by July 1," Barbato writes. She explains that the new law requires "all clinics and physicians' offices that perform more than 50 abortions per year to be licensed as ambulatory surgical treatment centers," meaning that they "will need to meet the same building requirements as hospital-style outpatient surgery centers," including "creating wider hallways and entrances ... and changing the size of the exam rooms." According to Barbato, only "about half of Tennessee's clinics -- just four in all -- meet the requirements of an ambulatory surgical center" and the remaining clinics, including those in more populous areas of the state, will "be forced to close unless they can upgrade their facilities by July 1." Citing figures from the Guttmacher Institute, Barbato notes that 23 states currently mandate similar requirements and that in one of those states, Texas, "the requirement has been successful at not only shutting clinics, but rendering abortion nearly obsolete for women outside metropolitan areas" (Barbato, Bustle, 5/9).

RELIGION AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH: "When the Catholic Church Owns Your Doctor: The Insidious New Threat to Affordable Birth Control," Patricia Miller, Salon: Having an obstetrician/gynecologist who is not able to prescribe contraceptives "could be a reality if your doctor's practice is purchased by a Catholic health system that then imposes the Ethical & Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, a set of rules created by the U.S. Bishop's Conference that prohibits doctors from doing everything from prescribing [birth control pills] to performing sterilizations or abortions," Miller writes. Health systems are purchasing "physician practices at an unprecedented rate," Miller continues, noting that "with Catholic hospital systems accounting for eight of the 10 ... largest nonprofit health systems in the U.S., these hospitals are poised to become major owners of doctors' offices, which could severely impede access to contraceptives if doctors are forced to follow the Directives." She notes that the Directives not only could require women "to face the inconvenience of making -- and paying -- for another doctor's appointment to get one of the most basic gynecological services," but also contribute to "a bigger problem" of stigmatizing and sidelining reproductive health care (Miller, Salon, 5/11).

ABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "Why Are We Still Asking if a Dying Woman Should Be Able To Get an Abortion To Save Her Life?" Jennifer Dalven, Huffington Post blogs: "All too often, we're still asking the wrong questions when it comes to gauging public opinion on abortion" that "do little to illuminate the reality of most women's lives and the range of feelings people have about abortions that happen in the real world," Dalven, director of the American Civil Liberties Union's Reproductive Freedom Project, writes. For example, she expresses doubt about whether one such extreme question -- "whether a woman should be forced to die rather than have an abortion" -- is "really still up for debate when it comes to public opinion." She explains that "it's been clear" for years "that when you ask people about how abortion impacts real women's lives -- instead of party-line questions about abortion under all circumstances or no circumstances -- you get surprising answers and high levels of agreement." For example, she notes that, when asked more nuanced questions, people's responses show "overwhelming agreement that a woman who has decided to get an abortion should be able to get one without additional hurdles," that "we shouldn't be passing laws that make a woman who has decided to get an abortion feel ashamed about her decision" and "that lawmakers who are determined to restrict access to abortion are moving our country in the wrong direction" (Dalven, Huffington Post blogs, 5/8).

ANTIABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "Is Your OB-GYN a Member of This Anti-Choice Group?" Anita Little, Ms. Magazine blog: Little writes about the American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists, "an organization of doctors, nurses and other medical professionals who strongly oppose abortion and some forms of contraception." While the group is "[u]nderreported and under the radar," Little writes, "they've been around for more than 40 years and have fought to dismantle pro-choice victories," such as "over-the-counter availability of Plan B" and FDA's approval of medication abortion drug Mifeprex. She lists several "falsehoods" held by AAPLOG and debunked by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, including claims that "[a]bortion is not safer than childbirth"; "ultrasound requirements before an abortion are necessary"; "[e]mergency contraception, also known as Plan B, should not be available over-the-counter"; "[b]reast cancer and abortion could be linked and further studies are required"; and "AAPLOG is somehow affiliated with or under the umbrella of ACOG." Little writes, "AAPLOG is the academic, institutionalized face of an extremist anti-abortion movement that has been whittling away at abortion access in communities across the country" (Little, Ms. Magazine blog, 5/11).

LGBT: "Oregon Bans 'Conversion Therapy' of LGBTQ Youth," Nina Liss-Schultz, RH Reality Check: Oregon is set to become "the fourth jurisdiction, following California, New Jersey, and Washington, D.C., to ban so-called conversion therapy for minors" under a bill (HB 2307) passed Friday by the state Senate, Liss-Schultz writes. She notes that conversion therapy, "in which mental health professionals seek to change a person's sexual identity or orientation, relies on both the outdated belief that non-straight sexual orientation is a mental health disorder and the discriminatory belief that same-sex orientation is of less value than heterosexuality." Conversion therapy "has been lambasted by the medical and mental health professional communities, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Psychological Association and the American Psychiatric Association," she adds, noting that bills similar to HB 2307 have been introduced in 17 states. Further, she notes that "[b]oth the California and New Jersey laws have recently held up in court" and that the Obama administration in April "threw its support behind the bans" (Liss-Schultz, RH Reality Check, 5/11).

CONTRACEPTION: "The New War on Your Birth Control: How Big Pharma and Hobby Lobby-Types Put IUDs Out of Reach," Valerie Tarico, Salon: Tarico discusses how the Liletta intrauterine device, a new IUD out this month, "may be a game changer" by "shatter[ing] the monopoly that has put top-tier contraceptives out of reach for many women." She writes that "an IUD is more than 20 times as effective as the pill" and is "far cheaper in the long run." However, she notes that "monopoly pricing," including high upfront costs, "has put top-tier birth control methods like IUD's and implants out of reach for many" U.S. women, including those who work for certain companies whose owners have religious objections to IUDs. "Enter Medicines360," Terico writes, explaining that the company, which manufactures the Liletta IUD, will help women by providing the device "to federally qualified health centers serving low income women for less than one fifth of what they are paying today ... substantially drop[ping the] wholesale IUD price for other clinics" and providing women with more choices (Tarico, Salon, 5/11).


Op-Ed Examines 'Systematic Failures' of U.S. Reproductive Health Care Behind Feticide Cases

Tue, 05/12/2015 - 14:16

The case of Purvi Patel has spurred "the expected anti-abortion and pro-choice debates," but it also can be used to evaluate women's access to reproductive health in the U.S., columnist Sharmila Rudrappa writes in an American Prospect/Public Voices Fellowship opinion piece.

Op-Ed Examines 'Systematic Failures' of U.S. Reproductive Health Care Behind Feticide Cases

May 12, 2015 — The case of Purvi Patel has spurred "the expected anti-abortion and pro-choice debates," but it also can be used to evaluate women's access to reproductive health in the U.S., columnist Sharmila Rudrappa writes in an American Prospect/Public Voices Fellowship opinion piece.

Rudrappa explains that Patel, "a 33-year old Indian immigrant from South Bend, Indiana, was charged with feticide and child neglect" based on allegations that she "attempted to terminate her second-trimester pregnancy with illegal pharmaceutical abortifacients" and disposed of the fetus before seeking medical care.

Rudrappa notes that while some have argued that Patel could have gotten an abortion during the first trimester of her pregnancy, the procedure "is not easily accessible in Indiana," which as of 2011 had "just 12 providers." Further, in Indiana, "[h]ealth plans ... and public funding cover abortions only if the woman's life is endangered, or she is a victim of rape or incest," Rudrappa writes, adding that women seeking abortion in the state also "must receive state-directed, in-person counseling including an ultrasound," be offered a choice to view the ultrasound and "wait 18 hours before any procedures can be initiated."

Further, Rudrappa questions how Patel's situation might "have been different if she had access to easily available, affordable reproductive care" beyond "simply abortion provision." She continues, "What if women and children had the right to broad sex education including contraception and not just abstinence; deeper understanding about pregnancies; comprehensive, easily accessible and high quality prenatal care; equally excellent and accessible post-natal care; and, emotional support for mother and child?"

Rudrappa cites the U.S.'s comparatively high rates of infant mortality and maternal death, adding, "What does it mean to punish women for ... their individual perceived moral failures, while remaining silent on the systemic failures that result in lack of support for women in their pregnancies, and after childbirth?" (Rudrappa, American Prospect, 5/10).


N.Y. AG Proposes Bill To Codify ACA's Contraceptive Coverage Benefits Into State Law

Tue, 05/12/2015 - 14:15

New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman (D) on Monday proposed a bill that would codify the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) contraceptive coverage rules into state law and add additional birth control benefits and protections, the New York Daily News reports.

N.Y. AG Proposes Bill To Codify ACA's Contraceptive Coverage Benefits Into State Law

May 12, 2015 — New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman (D) on Monday proposed a bill that would codify the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) contraceptive coverage rules into state law and add additional birth control benefits and protections, the New York Daily News reports (Blain, New York Daily News, 5/10).

Background

Federal guidance on the contraceptive coverage rules under the ACA states that insurers must cover the full range of FDA-approved contraceptive methods without cost sharing (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/17). However, some insurers have denied full coverage of some methods or imposed copays, according to recent reports, the Daily News reports (New York Daily News, 5/10).

On Thursday, Schneiderman requested information from 11 insurers in the state regarding their contraceptive coverage. Schneiderman's office has requested that the insurers respond to a list of 10 questions regarding coverage for birth control by May 28.

Bill Details

Schneiderman's bill, called the Comprehensive Contraception Coverage Act of 2015, would allow individuals to receive one year's supply of birth control at one time (Hughes, Albany Times Union, 5/11).

In addition, it would prohibit insurers from denying or limiting birth control coverage by using medical management techniques (New York Daily News, 5/10). The ACA permits insurers to use "reasonable medical management techniques" to curb costs, such as only covering the generic version of an approved contraceptive (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/17).

Further, the bill would require New York insurers to cover men's contraceptive methods, including condoms and vasectomies.

Comments

Schneiderman said, "New Yorkers should not be penalized by their insurance companies for using the birth control method that they and their medical provider agree is most appropriate for them" (Albany Times Union, 5/11).

Meanwhile, Leslie Moran, senior vice president of the New York Health Plan Association, said insurers in the state currently are complying with the ACA's contraceptive coverage rules. She said, "There is a shared goal of the state and the health plans to provide access to coverage, including contraception" (New York Daily News, 5/10).